Description of Courses

The following list represents courses and seminars offered in the Division of Theological and Historical Studies. The list does not contain specific information regarding the session, time, and location of offering. This information will be made available to the student by the Registrar’s Office prior to registration.

Christian Ethics

ETHC5300 Christian Ethics (3 hours) Lemke, Riley
In this introduction to the study and practice of Christian ethics, the student will examine philosophical and theological backgrounds for ethics, the role of biblical authority, and the historical relation between church and culture in order to develop a valid method of moral decision making; examine the importance of ministerial ethics; and evaluate ethical issues in order to lead the church in applying the gospel to life.

ETHC6201 Marriage and Family: A Christian Perspective (2 hours) Faculty
This course is an ethical study of the biblical basis for Christian family life, utilizing insights from theology, sociology, and psychology. Emphasis will be upon the Christian interpretation of marriage, marital roles and relationships, sexuality, parenting, divorce and remarriage, and “clergy” marriages. Prerequisite: ETHC5300 Christian Ethics or ETHC6301 Biblical Ethics.

ETHC6237/6337 Missional Ethics and the Great Commission (2 or 3 hours) Riley, Pinckard
This course is designed to equip those engaged in the Great Commission with the tools needed to evaluate cross-cultural moralities and to respond consistently and ethically within a Christian worldview. Students will understand more clearly the nature of the moral life and learn to apply a Christian ethic to issues encountered transculturally. Topics addressed include worldviews and morality, cultural distinctions, ethical implications of guilt, shame, and fear driven cultures, polygamy and other culturally distinct expressions of marriage and family, responding to bribery and corruption, truthtelling, and other ethical concerns for those involved in cross-cultural ministries. Also can be taken as MISS6237/6337.

ETHC6301 Biblical Ethics (3 hours) Riley
The ethics of the Old Testament, intertestamental period, and New Testament, in the light of their historical context, are the major areas of consideration. Their relevance to contemporary Christian living forms a necessary corollary. Attention will be given to tools for applying biblical ethics such as exegetical studies.

ETHC6302 Ministerial Ethics (3 hours) Lemke, Riley
This course is a study of the personal and professional ethics required of church ministers, religious counselors, and other “ministerial professionals,” as well as the ethical decisions unique to these roles. Particular emphasis is given to the minister’s professional code of ethics, structure of practice, and personal character. Prerequisite: ETHC5300 Christian Ethics or ETHC6301 Biblical Ethics.

ETHC6303 Current Ethical Issues (3 hours) Riley
The development of a Christian response to contemporary ethical issues is the aim of this study, focusing upon moral questions in personal ethics, sexuality and marriage, biomedical ethics, gender and ethnic relationships, economic concerns, political issues, and the development of a strategy for social action and ministry. Prerequisite: ETHC5300 Ethics or ETHC6301 Biblical Ethics.

ETHC6304 Development of Christian Ethical Thought (3 hours) Riley
This course introduces students to the ethics of selected Christian leaders and significant historical movements from the New Testament times through the twentieth century. Prerequisite: ETHC5300 Christian Ethics.

ETHC6305 Religious Liberty and the Law (3 hours) Harsch, Taylor, Riley
This course will study how courts in the United States have interpreted the First Amendment’s guarantee of Religious Liberty, with an emphasis on Supreme Court cases. Legal briefs, judicial decisions and commentary on court rulings will be explored. Attention will be given to the tension between the Free Exercise Clause and the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment. Ethical implications of these decisions will be explored. Also may be taken as HIST6305.

ETHC6311 Theology of Sexuality and Gender (3 hours) Riley
This course is a biblical and theological analysis of manhood and womanhood. Topics to be investigated include the nature of man and woman as created by God, the effects of the Fall upon gender, and the implications of Christ’s redemption upon the roles and relationships of men and women. Also may be taken as THEO6311 or WSTU6311.

ETHC6334 The Church and Political Involvement (3 hours) Riley
This course is designed to explore the interaction between the Church and the political arena. Topics include Christians as politicians; political involvement by pastors; and the role the Church plays in society. Attention will be given to contemporary settings and to historical contexts which have set the precedence for modern understandings of church/state relationships. Also can be taken as HIST6334.

ETIS6100-6300 Independent Directed Study in Ethics (1-3 hours) Faculty

Church History

HIST5201 History of Christianity: Reformation-Modern (2 hours) Butler, Harsch, Holcomb
This course provides a general historical survey of the Christian movement from the Protestant Reformation to the present. Attention is given to significant ideas, individuals, movements, and institutions in the development of Christianity during the Reformation and modern periods.

HIST5223 Baptist Heritage (2 hours) Butler, Harsch, Holcomb
This course surveys Baptist history, polity, and theology from seventeenth-century origins to the present, with primary emphasis on developments in England and North America. Attention is given to Anabaptist and English Separatist antecedents, intellectual and social currents that have shaped Baptist life and thought, institutional developments, theological distinctives and crises, the shaping of Baptist polity, and contributions of selected Baptist leaders.

HIST5300 History of Christianity: Early-Medieval (3 hours) Butler, Harsch, Holcomb
This course provides a general historical survey of the Christian movement from its inception through the Medieval period. A brief introduction to historical method and historiography is followed by the study of significant ideas, individuals, movements, and institutions in the rise and development of Christianity prior to the Protestant Reformation.

HIST5302 Exploring Women’s Studies (3 hours) Faculty
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the major historical and ideological concepts that contributed to the development of women’s studies as an academic discipline. Can also be taken as WSTU5302.

HIIS5100-5300 Independent Directed Study in Church History (1-3 hours) Butler, Harsch, Holcomb
HIST6201/6301 History of Early Christianity (2 or 3 hours) Butler, Harsch, Holcomb
An examination of the historical development of the Christian movement from the apostolic period to the pontificate of Gregory I (590-604), giving attention to major individuals, ideas, institutions, movements, and crises. The interaction of Christianity and its cultural, religious, and political environments is addressed.

HIST6202/6302 Christian Devotional Classics (2 or 3 hours) Holcomb
An introduction to the rich heritage of Christian mystical and devotional literature. Works such as Augustine’s Confessions, Bernard’s The Love of God, Thomas a Kempis’s Imitation of Christ, the anonymous German Theology and The Cloud of Unknowing, Pascal’s Pensees, Brother Lawrence’s The Practice of the Presence of God, Jeremy Taylor’s Holy Living and Holy Dying, and Kierkegaard’s Purity of Heart are studied in their historical contexts and analyzed for their spiritual content and influence.

HIST6213/6313 The Radical Reformation (2 or 3 hours) Holcomb
An intensive examination of the radical streams of the Protestant Reformation of the sixteenth century. Attention is given to the Anabaptist, Spiritualist, and Evangelical Rationalist movements, their major representatives, historical development, theological and political significance, and influence upon later denominational expressions of Christianity.

HIST6222/6322 Modern Renewal Movements (2 or 3 hours) Harsch
A discussion of the concept of renewal is followed by analyses of puritanism, pietism, evangelicalism, tractarianism, revivalism, ecumenism, and selected contemporary efforts interpreted as attempts to encourage Christian renewal.

HIST6224/6324 Contemporary American Religion (2 or 3 hours) Harsch
The historical background of the contemporary religious situation in America is depicted. Recent ecclesiastical developments, theological changes, cultural problems, and practical emphases are studied. Major attention is devoted to a study of selected denominational groups.

HIST6225/6325 History of the Southern Baptist Convention (2 or 3 hours) Harsch
This course examines the history of the Southern Baptist Convention, its structure, constituency, theology, ministry, and major controversies. Attention also is given to Baptist antecedents in the South (1607-1845).

HIST6235/6335 American Denominations (2 or 3 hours) Harsch
The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the various Christian denominations existing in the United States. The history, polity, and theology of each denominational family (Lutheran, Methodist, etc.) will be studied. Current denominational trends and future viability will be discussed.

HIST6305 Religious Liberty and the Law (3 hours) Harsch, Taylor
This course will study how courts in the United States have interpreted the First Amendment’s guarantee of Religious Liberty, with an emphasis on Supreme Court cases. Legal briefs, judicial decisions and commentary on court rulings will be explored. Attention will be given to the tension between the Free Exercise Clause and the Establishment Clause of the First Amendment. Ethical implications of these decisions will be explored. Also may be taken as ETHC6305.

HIST6311 Renaissance and Reformation (3 hours) Harsch, Holcomb
A study of Christianity in Western Europe during the period 1300-1648. The character, development, interrelationship, and cultural impact of the Renaissance and the Catholic and Protestant Reformations are explored.

HIST6321 History of Modern Christianity (3 hours) Butler, Holcomb
A survey of the history of Christianity since 1648. Primary focus is on Protestant and Roman Catholic developments in Western Europe, Great Britain, and North America. Attention is given also to Eastern rite and Third World churches. The impact of modernity and postmodernity on the Christian movement is addressed.

HIST6326 History of American Christianity (3 hours) Harsch
This course provides historical interpretation of American Christianity with emphasis on significant trends, institutions, intellectual patterns, and leaders. An effort is made to treat American Christianity as a dynamic aspect of American culture. Attention is given to theological as well as institutional developments.

HIST6327 Heresy and Orthodoxy in the Early Church (3 hours) Butler
This course covers early heresies, the initial responses of the church, later Christological heresies, and the ecumenical councils. Topics include Gnosticism and the Gnostic Gospels, Marcion, Monarchianism, Montanism, canonization, creeds, apostolic succession, Arianism and the Council of Nicea. Attention also is given to contemporary critics of traditional orthodoxy and to modern expressions of early heresies with the intention of developing an effective apologetic response. Also can be taken as THEO6327.

HIST6330 Women in the Early Church (3 hours) Butler
This course is designed to explore the history of women in the early church. Topics include women in the New Testament and in the patristic writings; development of women’s ministries; and the lives of women who served in the early church in a variety of ways. Attention also will be given to contemporary applications of women’s issues as taught and practiced in the early church. Also can be taken as WSTU6330.

HIST6331 History of American Preaching (3 hours) Butler
This course is a study of selected American preachers from the First Great Awakening through the twentieth century. The study provides an investigation into the historical context of the preachers, their sermons, and their influence on the church and society in America. Also can be taken as PREA6331.

HIST6334 The Church and Political Involvement (3 hours) Harsch, Riley
This course is designed to explore the interaction between the Church and the political arena. Topics include Christians as politicians; political involvement by pastors; and the role the Church plays in society. Attention will be given to contemporary settings and to historical contexts which have set the precedence for modern understandings of church/state relationships. Also can be taken as ETHC6334.

HIST6358 Persecution and Martyrdom Yesterday and Today (3 hours) Butler
This course examines persecution and martyrdom and the resulting theology of suffering in the early church and in the contemporary world in various global church settings. The course follows a seminar-based and student-led format with intense reading, discussion, research, and writing. Also can be taken as THEO6358 or MISS6358.

HIIS6100-6300 Independent Directed Study in Church History (1-3 hours) Butler, Harsch, Holcomb

HISR9301 Early-Medieval Christianity (3 hours)
This colloquium is designed for and led by Doctor of Philosophy and Masters of Theology students under the supervision of the faculty of the Theological and Historical Studies Division, with focused readings in Early and Medieval Christianity.

Islamic Studies

THEO6324 The Doctrine of Prayer (3 hours)    
This course provides a biblical, theological and historical examination of the Bible’s teaching on prayer. Topics will include the forms and theology of prayer in the Old and New Testament. Attention also is given to an examination of the Lord’s Prayer as a paradigm of a believer’s prayer.

THEO6329 Jesus and Islam (3 hours) Edens
This course involves the student in a historical and theological exploration in the Islamic understanding of the person and work of Jesus Christ and how Muslim apologists employ these teachings. Participants will engage in significant, guided research in the Christian and Muslim teachings of who Jesus is and the significance of His work. Discussions will explore avenues of negative and positive apologetics in Christocentric witness to Muslims. Also can be taken as PHIL6329.

THEO6332 The Doctrine of God in Christianity and Islam (3 hours) Edens, Holcomb
The doctrine of God is foundational in theological reflection. In fact, the discipline of theology may be defined as a sustained meditation on the being and purpose of God. In their understanding of God, Christianity and Islam share some common roots but also manifest sharp and striking differences. The workshop explores these commonalities and differences as they developed historically, beginning with the early Islamic period (632-1000 AD), continuing through the period 1300-1600 AD, and most recently 1800 AD to the present. Our goal is to equip students for intelligent dialogue and insightful witness. Also can be taken as PHIL6332.

THEO6333 Word of God in Christianity and Islam (3 hours) Edens
This course compares a biblical and Christian understanding of the doctrine of revelation and the Bible with Islamic teaching. The course will explore Muslim views about the Bible and Qur’an and the role of prophets and messengers. The relationship between general and special revelation in the Islamic worldview as well as human ability to perceive and respond to God will be discussed. The theoretical aspects of these issues will be balanced with the challenge to communicate a witness of Jesus Christ as Lord with persons absorbed in the Islamic worldview. Also can be taken as PHIL6333.

THEO6334 Christian Responses to Islamic Cultural Differences (3 hours) Edens
This course provides an overview of the mosaic of Muslim worldviews with a brief survey of significant historic and modern Islamic movements and individuals representative of each worldview. A major element in examining each Islamic worldview will be exploring ways to present Christian truth to adherents of the value system. Also can be taken as PHIL6306.

THEO6335 World Religions: Islam (3 hours) Edens
This introduction to Islam provides students the opportunity to gain understanding of the worldview, history, traditions, sacred literature, doctrines and practices of this rapidly spreading faith. Emphasis is given to equipping students for effective Christian witness among Muslims through examination of barriers and bridges to the gospel within Islam. Also can be taken as PHIL6307 or MISS6245/6345.

THEO6236/6336 Practices in Muslim Witness and Evangelism (2 or 3 hours) Edens, Brooks
This course provides a theological, philosophical, apologetic, evangelism and mission’s methods overview of witness and evangelism practices among Muslims. The course will explore contemporary witness to Muslims employing class room lecture, reading, and guided research to inform students committed to engage in Muslim evangelism. Also can be taken as MISS6236/6336, PHIL6236/6336, or EVAN6236/6336.

THEO6399 Mission Trip to the Muslim World (3 hours) Edens
The course is set within a mission trip to a specific city in the Muslim Middle East. Participants will be engaged in a well developed and respected ESL witness program. Students will be prepared to join in pre-evangelism, harvest evangelism, and follow-up work within a group of Muslim adult students. Participants will be exposed to many issues faced by converts from Islam, witness to Muslims open to the gospel, and establish new believers by assisting them to enter into spiritual disciplines both through face to face and Internet interaction. Also can be taken as MISS6399 or EVAN6399. Prerequisite: THEO6336 or EVAN6336 or MISS6336 or PHIL6336.

PHIL6306 Christian Responses to Islamic Cultural Differences (3 hours) Edens
This course provides an overview of the mosaic of Muslim worldviews with a brief survey of significant historic and modern Islamic movements and individuals representative of each worldview. A major element in examining each Islamic worldview will be exploring ways to present Christian truth to adherents of the value system. Also can be taken as THEO6334.

PHIL6307 World Religions: Islam (3 hours) Brooks, Edens
This introduction to Islam provides students the opportunity to gain understanding of the worldview, history, traditions, sacred literature, doctrines and practices of this rapidly spreading faith. Emphasis is given to equipping students for effective Christian witness among Muslims through examination of barriers and bridges to the gospel within Islam. Also can be taken as MISS6245/6345 or THEO6335.

PHIL6329 Jesus and Islam (3 hours) Edens
This course involves the student in a historical and theological exploration in the Islamic understanding of the person and work of Jesus Christ and how Muslim apologists employ these teachings. Participants will engage in significant, guided research in the Christian and Muslim teachings of who Jesus is and the significance of His work. Discussions will explore avenues of negative and positive apologetics in Christocentric witness to Muslims. Also can be taken as THEO6329.

PHIL6332 The Doctrine of God in Christianity and Islam (3 hours) Edens, Holcomb
The doctrine of God is foundational in theological reflection. In fact, the discipline of theology may be defined as a sustained meditation on the being and purpose of God. In their understanding of God, Christianity and Islam share some common roots but also manifest sharp and striking differences. The workshop explores these commonalities and differences as they developed historically, beginning with the early Islamic period (632-1000 AD), continuing through the period 1300-1600 AD, and most recently 1800 AD to the present. Our goal is to equip students for intelligent dialogue and insightful witness. Also can be taken as THEO6332.

PHIL6333 Word of God in Christianity and Islam (3 hours) Edens
This course compares a biblical and Christian understanding of the doctrine of revelation and the Bible with Islamic teaching. The course will explore Muslim views about the Bible and Qur’an and the role of prophets and messengers. The relationship between general and special revelation in the Islamic worldview as well as human ability to perceive and respond to God will be discussed. The theoretical aspects of these issues will be balanced with the challenge to communicate a witness of Jesus Christ as Lord with persons absorbed in the Islamic worldview. Also can be taken as THEO6333.

PHIL6236/6336 Practices in Muslim Witness and Evangelism (2 or 3 hours) Edens, Brooks
This course provides a philosophical, theological, apologetic, evangelism and mission’s methods overview of witness and evangelism practices among Muslims. The course will explore contemporary witness to Muslims employing class room lecture, reading, and guided research to inform students committed to engage in Muslim evangelism. Also can be taken as MISS6236/6336, THEO6236/6336, or EVAN6236/6336.

Philosophy of Religion and Apologetics

PHIL5300 Philosophy of Religion (3 hours) Lemke, Stewart, Brooks, Putman
A philosophical examination of fundamental religious beliefs and concepts with primary focus on the claims and warrants of Christian theism. Lectures and readings address classical and contemporary perspectives on the relationship of faith and reason, the nature of religious language, arguments for the existence of God, religious experience, the nature and persistence of evil, miracles, death and immortality, and the relationships of Christianity and other religious traditions. The course constitutes a call to intellectual accountability in relation to issues of ultimate concern to Christian faith.

PHIL5301 Christian Apologetics (3 hours) Stewart, Putman
This course examines barriers to Christian faith as well as efforts to provide convincing presentations of Christian faith. Attention is given to biblical foundations, historical development, apologetic method, and contemporary issues related to apologetics.

PHIL6301 Philosophical Theology (3 hours) Stewart
This course will involve a study of philosophical issues related to the Christian concept of God such as the attributes of God, the intelligibility and coherence of the Incarnation and the Trinity, and the solutions offered by selected contemporary philosophers addressing these issues. Prerequisites: PHIL5300 Philosophy of Religion and THEO5300 Systematic Theology 1.

PHIL6302 Contemporary Hermeneutical Theory (3 hours) Stewart, Putman
The course introduces students to philosophical issues related to general hermeneutics and biblical interpretation. Issues addressed include the nature of the hermeneutical task, the nature of texts, the role of the reader, and the significance of philosophy, history, literary criticism, and theology for biblical interpretation. Representative interpreters from a wide array of hermeneutical perspectives will be examined. Prerequisites: PHIL5300 Philosophy of Religion and BSHM5310 Biblical Hermeneutics. Also can be taken as THEO6319.

PHIL6303 Logic (3 hours) Stewart
This course introduces students to basic principles of logic and critical thinking and how to apply them as part of a Christian intellectual life. Attention will be given to the use of logic in biblical interpretation, theological construction, philosophical explanation, and apologetic and evangelistic presentation.

PHIL6304 Apologetic Method (3 hours) Stewart
The course further prepares students to interact knowledgeably with historical and methodological issues related to the defense of the Christian worldview. Issues addressed include biblical apologetics, patristic apologetics, medieval apologetics, Reformation apologetics, modern and postmodern apologetics, various apologetic methods, and the thinkers who have developed and used them. The course focuses upon personal reading, research, and writing.

PHIL6305 The Problem of Evil (3 hours) Stewart, Putman, Lemke
The course introduces students to contemporary philosophical issues related to the Christian concept of God and the problem of evil. Issues addressed include the nature of evil, the cause of evil, the intelligibility and coherence of the Christian concept of God in light of evil, and solutions offered by various world religions to the problem of evil, as well as representative solutions offered by a selection of contemporary philosophers addressing this topic. The thrust of the course will focus upon personal reading, research, and writing.

PHIL6308 Metaphysics (3 hours) Stewart
This course consists of a sustained examination of some of the most basic concerns of life: what sorts of things exist, how the objects of our experience are composed, how those objects are able to change and persist through time, if they are able, and whether the world of our experience may be at least in part constructed by our conceptualizations of it. Attention will be given not only to these questions but to methodological issues related to answering these vital questions.

PHIL6209/6309 Encountering World Religions (2 or 3 hours) Edens, Lemke, Stewart
The course examines the major world religions: Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism, as well as other faiths such as Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto, and Sikhism, from the perspective of underlying worldview, history, tradition, sacred literature, doctrines, and practices. Emphasis is placed on the use of primary sources and personal contact with practitioners. Attention is given to particular barriers to the Gospel, as well as to promising avenues for sharing the Gospel associated with each religion. Also can be taken as MISS6209/6309.

PHIL6310 Epistemology (3 hours) Stewart
The course introduces students to basic principles of epistemology and how to apply them as part of a Christian intellectual life. Attention will be given to epistemology in religious experience, theological construction, philosophical explanation, and apologetic and evangelistic presentation.

PHIL6311 Christianity and the Sciences (3 hours) Stewart
This course is a study of the relationship between Christianity and the natural, social, and mathematical sciences. It will survey the history of the relationship between Christianity and the sciences, with a critique of the “warfare metaphor.” Special attention will be given to the creation/ evolution debate. The question of the possibility of a natural theology will be addressed, with an assessment of the various approaches. The scientific disciplines will be surveyed, such as mathematics, physics, biology, geology, psychology, and the social sciences, along with their impact on Christian thought. Also can be taken as THEO6309.

PHIL6312 Introduction to Modal Logic (3 hours) Stewart
This course is about the logic of Necessity and Possibility. Necessity and possibility are central notions in most branches of philosophy - Metaphysics, Epistemology, Philosophy of Science, Philosophy of Language, Philosophy of Logic, Philosophy of Mathematics, and Ethics—as well as in Computer Science, Linguistics, and Cognitive Science. The course will focus both on Possible-Worlds Semantics—the semantics of modal logic—and on axiomatizations and proofs concerning necessity and possibility.

PHIL6314 Theology of C. S. Lewis (3 hours) Stewart
The course examines the biographical background, theological issues addressed, philosophical beliefs and practices, and apologetic methods of Clive Staples Lewis. Special attention will be given to Lewis’s writings. Also can be taken as THEO6314.

PHIL6320 Dealing with Bible Difficulties (3 hours) Stewart
This course surveys the nature of Scripture, basic Christian convictions concerning the doctrine of Scripture, and the sorts of claims that are brought against the reliability of the Bible, particularly to its textual and historical reliability. Additionally, attention will be given to common claims that there are contradictions in the Bible and, when appropriate, to issues concerning the development of the canon of Scripture. Also may be taken as THEO6320.

PHIL6322 Pulpit Apologetics (3 hours) Faculty
This is an advanced course which considers the role of apologetics in expository preaching. Students are exposed to a variety of homiletical approaches aimed at demonstrating the truth and relevance of God’s Word in contemporary culture. Emphasis is given to proclamation aimed at forming a Christian worldview in the minds and hearts of hearers. Recommended prerequisites are PREA5300 Proclaiming the Bible and PHIL5301 Christian Apologetics. Also can be taken as PREA6222/6322.

PHIL6328 Postmodernity & Contemporary Theological Issues (3 hours) Brooks
This course exposes students to recent trends in philosophical and theological studies with an emphasis on the influence of postmodernity. Special attention will be given to theology’s relationship to postmodern culture and how such a relationship influences the local church and its ministries. Also can be taken as THEO6328.

PHIL6360 Campus Apologetics (3 hours) Faculty
This course examines barriers to Christian faith as well as efforts to provide convincing presentations of Christian faith within the context of student ministry. Attention is given to biblical foundations, historical development, apologetic method, and contemporary issues related to apologetics.

PHIL6370 Supervised Apologetics Ministry Practicum (3 hours) Faculty
This course is a semester-length, practical learning experience that involves the student through the supervision of an academic professor and an approved apologetic ministry. The student will practice the art of apologetics under supervision within an apologetic ministry. Several apologetics ministries have been approved for student supervision. Students may also request approval of the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary Institute of Christian Apologetics for other supervision options. Students must have approval from the professor of record, prior to registration in this course.

PHIS6200/6300 Independent Directed Study in Philosophy (2 or 3 hours) Lemke, Stewart

Theology: Historical Theology

THEO6225/6325 Ancient and Medieval Theology (2 or 3 hours) Butler, Putman
This course introduces the student to the study of the history of Christian doctrine. Special attention is given to the development of Christian doctrine in the early church in the first five centuries of the Christian era, as revealed in the writings of the early Christian fathers and the documents of the church councils, and to the further development of Christian doctrine in the Middle Ages from the collapse of the Roman Empire to the Reformation.

THEO6226/6326 Reformation and Modern Theology (2 or 3 hours) Putman, Riley
This course is a survey of the developments in theology in the era of the Reformation in the sixteenth century, the era of Protestant Orthodoxy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, and the theologies which have emerged in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Special attention is given to the proliferation of theologies in the twentieth century.

THEO6327 Heresy and Orthodoxy in the Early Church (3 hours) Butler
This course covers early heresies, the initial responses of the church, later Christological heresies, and the ecumenical councils. Topics include Gnosticism and the Gnostic Gospels, Marcion, Monarchianism, Montanism, canonization, creeds, apostolic succession, Arianism and the Council of Nicea. Attention also is given to contemporary critics of traditional orthodoxy and to modern expressions of early heresies with the intention of developing an effective apologetic response. Also can be taken as HIST6327.

THEO6328 Postmodernity and Contemporary Theological Issues (3 hours) Brooks
The purpose of this course is to expose students to recent trends in philosophical and theological studies with an emphasis on the influence of postmodernity. Special attention will be given to theology’s relationship to postmodern culture and how such a relationship influences the local church and its ministries. Also can be taken as PHIL6328.

THIS6100/6200/6300 Independent Directed Study in Theology (1, 2, or 3 hours) Faculty

Theology: Systematic Theology

THEO5300 Systematic Theology 1 (3 hours) Brooks, Edens, Stewart, Riley, Putman, Harwood
This first course in systematic theology introduces the student to the methodology of the study of theology (Prolegomena) and the doctrines of revelation, God, humanity, and the person of Christ. The biblical foundation and the relevant historical developments are considered in construction of a Christian understanding of each doctrine.

THEO5301 Systematic Theology 2 (3 hours) Brooks, Edens, Stewart, Riley, Putman, Harwood
This second course in systematic theology introduces the student to the doctrines of the work of Christ, salvation and the Christian life, the Holy Spirit, the church, and last things (eschatology). The biblical foundation and the relevant historical developments are considered in developing a comprehensive statement of Christian teaching concerning construction of a Christian understanding of each doctrine. Prerequisite: It is highly suggested that students take THEO5300 Systematic Theology 1 before taking this course.

THEO5337 Theological and Practical Issues in Chaplaincy (3 hours) Brooks
The purpose of this course is to expose students to issues in chaplaincy ministry, including theological and apologetic issues, as well as practical pastoral ministry and counseling. The course surveys various types of chaplaincy ministry, approaches to pastoral counseling, and apologetic issues. The course is taught with a view towards enabling the student to take advanced courses in theology and pastoral ministry and apply concepts specifically to a chaplaincy context. Also can be taken as PATH5337.

THEO6300 Theological Method (3 hours) Putman
This advanced, seminar-style course in systematic theology introduces students to key issues in theological prolegomena and to a variety of methods employed by contemporary theologians. Students will read and offer critical analysis of seminal works in modern and contemporary theology and theological method from diverse cultural and theological objectives.

THEO6301 The Doctrine of Revelation (3 hours) Faculty
This course provides a biblical, historical, and theological examination of the doctrines of revelation and the Bible. This study assists students to begin formation of a systematic, Christian perspective upon these issues. An understanding of the doctrine of revelation and the Bible is basic to all other doctrines because the Christian faith and theology are based upon God’s self-revelation. Students will investigate the theoretical issues involved in these doctrines as well as develop the implications of their findings for Christian living and ministry.

THEO6302 The Person and Work of Christ (3 hours) Faculty
This course provides a biblical, historical, and theological examination of the person and work of Christ. This study assists students to begin the formation of a systematic, Christian perspective on this crucial doctrine. Topics will include deity of Christ, humanity of Christ, the incarnation, life, death, resurrection, ascension, and session of Christ, the offices of Christ, and theories of Atonement.

THEO6303 The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit (3 hours) Faculty
This course provides a biblical, historical, and theological examination of the doctrine of the person and work of the Holy Spirit. This study assists students to begin formation of a systematic, Christian perspective upon this issue. Attention is given to the relationship of the Holy Spirit to the Father and the Son as well as the role of the Holy Spirit in the conversion of the lost, the growth and development of believers, and the function of the church as the body of Christ. The modern charismatic movement and the issue of the gifts of the Holy Spirit are also explored. Students will investigate the theoretical issues involved in this doctrine as well as develop the implications of their findings for Christian living and ministry.

THEO6304 Eschatology (3 hours) Faculty
This course provides a biblical, historical, and theological examination of the doctrine of last things (eschatology). This study assists students to begin formation of a systematic, Christian perspective upon this issue. Students will develop an awareness of the issues and values in a Christian understanding of death, life after death, the resurrection, the second coming, and the eternal states. The relationships between eschatology and preaching, evangelism, and ministry are also explored. Students will investigate the theoretical issues involved in this doctrine as well as develop the implications of their findings for Christian living and ministry.

THEO6305 Issues in Contemporary Theology (3 hours) Stewart, Putman
An intensive study is made of recent trends and issues in theology. Attention is devoted to representative theologians, developments, and theological methods. Assessments of the impact of these trends and issues upon Baptist and evangelical theology are also investigated. Prerequisites: THEO5300 Systematic Theology 1 and THEO5301 Systematic Theology 2.

THEO6306 Cult Theology (3 hours) Stewart, Putman
This course involves a theological analysis of groups that are classified as cults, or cultic in nature, from the perspective of evangelical Christianity. Groups covered include The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, New Age Movements, the Watchtower Society, the Unity School of Christianity, the Word-Faith Movement, Armstrongism, the Unification Church, and Scientology. Prerequisites:THEO5300 Systematic Theology 1 andTHEO5301 Systematic Theology 2.

THEO6307 The Doctrine of Salvation (3 hours) Harwood
This course provides a biblical, historical, and systematic examination of soteriology, or the doctrine of salvation. In this course, students can expect to address a number of questions pertinent to the doctrine: What is the nature of salvation? What are the distinctive, biblical elements of salvation? What, if any, logical order can be construed in the arrangement of these elements? Students may choose to focus on any one of these questions, or tighten their focus on a particular area such as election, conversion, justification, sanctification, or perseverance.

THEO6308 The Doctrine of the Church (3 hours) Faculty
This course in theology introduces the student to the doctrine of church-ecclesiology. The student will begin formation of a systematic, biblical perspective on the church both contemporary and historical. Biblical teachings of church functions and practices will be explored. The biblical descriptions of the tasks of pastors, bishops, elders, deacons and members of the body of Christ will be examined.

THEO6309 Christianity and the Sciences (3 hours) Faculty
This course is a study of the relationship between Christianity and the natural, social, and mathematical sciences. It will survey the history of the relationship between Christianity and the sciences, with a critique of the “warfare metaphor.” Special attention will be given to the creation/ evolution debate. The question of the possibility of a natural theology will be addressed, with an assessment of the various approaches. The scientific disciplines will be surveyed, such as mathematics, physics, biology, geology, psychology, and the social sciences, along with their impact on Christian thought. Also can be taken as PHIL6311.

THEO6310 The Historical Jesus (3 hours) Stewart
The seminar introduces students to theological, biblical, and philosophical methodological issues related to contemporary Historical Jesus research. Issues addressed include the nature of the task, the role of the historian, tools for the task, as well as past and contemporary personalities in Historical Jesus research. The seminar will emphasize personal reading, research, and writing. Also can be taken as NTEN6310.

THEO6311 Theology of Sexuality and Gender (3 hours) Riley
This course is a biblical and theological analysis of manhood and womanhood. Topics to be investigated include the nature of man and woman as created by God, the effects of the Fall upon gender, and the implications of Christ’s redemption upon the roles and relationships of men and women. Also can be taken as ETHC6311 or WSTU6311.

THEO6312 Creation and Creationism (3 hours) Faculty
This course is a study of the doctrine of creation. The course will investigate biblical foundations, survey the historical developments, analyze the relationship of the doctrine to other significant doctrines such as the doctrine of God and providence, and explore the impact of the doctrine on the development of science as a discipline. The course will also survey current theories of creation, from process theism to evangelical methods of interpreting the opening chapters of Genesis.

THEO6313 British Apologists (3 hours) Stewart
The course examines the biographical background, issues addressed by, and apologetic methods employed by British defenders of the Christian faith. Special attention is given to British apologists of the latter half of the Twentieth Century.

THEO6314 Theology of C. S. Lewis (3 hours) Stewart
This course examines the biographical background, theological issues addressed, philosophical beliefs and practices, and apologetic methods of Clive Staples Lewis. Special attention will be given to Lewis’s writings. Also can be taken as PHIL6314.

THEO6315 Mormonism (3 hours) Putman, Stewart
The purpose of this course is to involve the student in an extensive study of history, theology, and praxis of Mormonism as well as the apologetic response of evangelical Christians so that the student can better articulate Christian orthodoxy and share his or her faith effectively with members of this cult.

THEO6316 Jehovah’s Witnesses (3 hours) Putman, Stewart
The purpose of this course is to involve the student in an extensive study of the history, theology, and praxis of the Watchtower Bible and Tract Society (Jehovah’s Witnesses) as well as the apologetic response of evangelical Christians so that the student can better articulate Christian orthodoxy and share his or her faith effectively with members of this cult.

THEO6318 The Doctrine of the Trinity (3 hours) Putman
This course examines the distinctively Christian doctrine of the Trinity and its implications for belief and practice. Students will explore the biblical foundations of the issue, become familiar the historical development of trinitarian doctrine, interact with the thought of past and present Christian theologians, and construct their own understanding of this crucial doctrine. This course also has an apologetic focus, equipping students to respond to religious sects that deny or misrepresent this central tenet of historic Christianity.

THEO6319 Contemporary Hermeneutical Theory (3 hours) Putman
The course introduces students to philosophical issues related to general hermeneutics and biblical interpretation. Issues addressed include the nature of the hermeneutical task, the nature of texts, the role of the reader, and the significance of philosophy, history, literary criticism, and theology for biblical interpretation. Representative interpreters from a wide array of hermeneutical perspectives will be examined. Prerequisites: PHIL5300 Philosophy of Religion and BSHM5310 Biblical Hermeneutics. Also can be taken as PHIL6302.

THEO6320 Dealing with Bible Difficulties (3 hours) Stewart
This course surveys the nature of Scripture, basic Christian convictions concerning the doctrine of Scripture, and the sorts of claims that are brought against the reliability of the Bible, particularly to its textual and historical reliability. Additionally, attention will be given to common claims that there are contradictions in the Bible and, when appropriate, to issues concerning the development of the canon of Scripture. Also may be taken as PHIL6320.

THEO6321 The Doctrine of Humanity (3 hours) Harwood
This course provides a biblical, historical, and theological examination of the doctrine of humanity. Topics will include the origin and nature of humanity, human constitution, the image of God, human dignity, responsibilities, characteristics, and relationships, and implications of being human in light of the fall and redemption.

THEO6322 The Doctrine of God (3 hours) Kendrick
This course provides a biblical, historical, and theological examination of the doctrine of God. Topics will include the classic expressions and challenges to the existence and nature of God and God’s acts of creation, decrees, and providential control over the universe.

THEO6328 Postmodernity & Contemporary Theological Issues (3 hours) Brooks
This course exposes students to recent trends in philosophical and theological studies with an emphasis on the influence of postmodernity. Special attention will be given to theology’s relationship to postmodern culture and how such a relationship influences the local church and its ministries. Also can be taken as PHIL6328.

THEO6358 Persecution and Martyrdom Yesterday and Today (3 hours) Butler, Edens
This course examines persecution and martyrdom and the resulting theology of suffering in the early church and in the contemporary world in various global church settings. The course follows a seminar-based and student-led format with intense reading, discussion, research, and writing. Also can be taken as HIST6358 or MISS6358.

THEO6399 Mission Trip to the Muslim World (3 hours) Edens
The course is set within a mission trip to a specific city in the Muslim Middle East. Participants will be engaged in a well developed and respected ESL witness program. Students will be prepared to join in pre-evangelism, harvest evangelism, and follow-up work within a group of Muslim adult students. Participants will be exposed to many issues faced by converts from Islam, witness to Muslims open to the gospel and establish new believers by assisting them to enter into spiritual disciplines both through face to face and Internet interaction. Also can be taken as MISS6399 or EVAN6399. Prerequisite: THEO6336 or EVAN6336 or MISS6336 or PHIL6336.

THIS6100/6200/6300 Independent Directed Study in Theology (1, 2, or 3 hours) Faculty THSE6300 Theological Research and Writing Seminar (3 hours) Putman
This advanced seminar in research and writing is intended to help prepare students for postgraduate work and future publication in theologically related fields. In this course, every student will prepare a final, summative writing assignment in his or her degree concentration. Those with concentrations in theological or historical studies may request approval to adapt this summative writing assignment into a formal thesis. Particular attention will be given to the different models of reasoning in research, the crafting and assessment of arguments, elements of form and style, and final editing. Only students within eighteen hours of graduation may take this course.

MTSA6100 Summative Assessment (1 hour) Faculty

Women’s Studies

WSTU5302 Exploring Women’s Studies (3 hours) Faculty
The purpose of this course is to acquaint the student with the major historical and ideological concepts that contributed to the development of women’s studies as an academic discipline. Can also be taken as HIST5302.

WSTU6311 Theology of Sexuality and Gender (3 hours) Riley
This course is a biblical and theological analysis of manhood and womanhood. Topics to be investigated include the nature of man and woman as created by God, the effects of the Fall upon gender, and the implications of Christ’s redemption upon the roles and relationships of men and women. Also can be taken as ETHC6311 or THEO6311.

WSTU6330 Women in the Early Church (3 hours) Butler
This course is designed to explore the history of women in the early church. Topics include women in the New Testament and in the patristic writings; development of women’s ministries; and the lives of women who served in the early church in a variety of ways. Attention also will be given to contemporary applications of women’s issues as taught and practiced in the early church. Also can be taken as HIST6330.

WSIS6151-6351 Independent Directed Study in Women’s Studies (1-3 hours)