Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Research Doctoral Oversight Committee (ReDOC)

The Research Doctoral Oversight Committee (ReDOC) is composed of the Associate Dean of Research Doctoral Programs, a representative from each of the academic divisions that offer PhD majors, two at-large faculty members, the Dean of Graduate Studies, the Associate Dean of Graduate Studies, and the Registrar. The committee meets monthly during the academic year. ReDOC provides administrative oversight for the research doctoral programs. The Associate Dean of Research Doctoral Programs is Dr. Jeff Riley. He can be contacted by phone at 504.816.8010 or 1.800.NOBTS.01, ext. 8010 or by e-mail at phd@nobts.edu.

Application Process

Printable application forms are available on the seminary website (www.nobts.edu/research). Potential applicants should review carefully all degree admission requirements before submitting an application. Those requirements are enumerated on the following pages. Completed applications must be submitted to the Office of Research Doctoral Programs no later than February 1 for August admission and September 1 for January admission. The following items must accompany the application by the February 1 or September 1 deadline:

  • Signed application form complete with all supporting documentation (Statement of Call and Commitment; Ethical Conduct; Church Endorsement; Transfer of Credit Request Form, if applicable; Health Certificate; Proof of Immunization; 4 reference forms)

  • Application fee

  • Verification of GRE verbal, quantitative, and analytical writing scores

  • Official transcripts from all colleges, universities, and seminaries

  • Written plan for completion of course prerequisites such as languages and hours in the major

  • Research paper from the master’s degree program

  • The applicant must complete a criminal background check through CastleBranch before the application can be considered.

  • International students should see the section “International Students” in this catalog for additional requirements.

Once the application is submitted, the applicant works with the Office of Research Doctoral Programs to complete the following:

  • Entrance examination

  • Division interview

The Doctoral Admissions Committee approves and denies admission to the research doctoral programs. All relevant information in the application packet (GPA, GRE scores) and the recommendation from the division (including evaluation of the master’s paper, entrance exam, and division interview) are considered in ascertaining the applicant’s potential for advanced research studies and making a final decision concerning admission.

After the Doctoral Admissions Committee has met, the Associate Dean of Research Doctoral Programs will notify applicants of acceptance or denial. Application decisions usually are made within six weeks following the application deadline. Applications are valid for one year. A person normally can apply only twice for a research doctoral program at NOBTS. An applicant who is denied admission to a research doctoral program must wait at least one semester to reapply and must meet all requirements in effect at the time of reapplication.

Enrollment

Once accepted into a research doctoral program, a student must begin his or her program of studies and enroll for seminars in the next regular semester.

If an applicant approved for admission to a doctoral program cannot begin studies, the applicant’s slot normally will be vacated and the application will be returned to the division applicant pool for consideration in the next semester.

After beginning studies, the student must maintain enrollment (register and pay matriculation fees) each semester until the doctoral program is completed. The research doctoral program is a continuous enrollment program until graduation. Failure to register and pay fees each semester will result in termination from the program.

All students in a research doctoral program have full-time status.

Research doctoral programs follow the graduate policy for drop/add and withdrawal. All requests for changes in registration must be made in writing to the Office of Research Doctoral Programs and must be received by the appropriate deadlines.

Faculty Guidance

At the time of admission to a research doctoral program, a faculty advisor from the major field of study will be assigned to serve as a resource person to the student concerning program matters and to guide the student through the residency/ThM candidacy stage. Upon successful completion of the qualifying examination, a two-member guidance committee will be assigned to mentor the student for the senior residency and candidacy stages of the program.

General Policies

  • Persons seeking the doctorate need to be highly motivated scholars.

  • All entering doctoral students in research degree programs must register for RDOC9300 Introduction to Doctoral Research and Writing during their first year in the program. Students who have not completed a course on the SBC and Cooperative Program will be registered for COOP9000 in conjunction with this course.

  • All research doctoral students must secure and maintain an e-mail address throughout the program.

  • The research doctoral programs are residential programs with courses normally offered on the main campus. Many courses also are available through synchronous interactive video (SYNC). Students should plan to spend minimally one full day in research weekly for each seminar.

    Thus, a student taking two seminars should be engaged in research minimally two full days weekly. Allocation of the necessary time in esearch is subject to review by the student’s guidance committee.

    The committee might recommend or require a reduced course load.

  • No seminar grade below “B” (3.0) will count toward degree requirements. Students making a grade of “C” must consult with their faculty advisor or guidance committee. Two seminar grades of “C” will result in the student’s dismissal from the doctoral program.

  • Students may be required by their department to remove deficiencies in their preparation by taking for credit courses from the master’s-level curriculum. In any case, students are encouraged to audit master’s-level classes in their field.

  • The period allowed for the completion of the PhD program is seven years from initial registration. After the fourth year the matriculation fee is increased, as stated in the student fee schedule in this catalog.

  • A master’s student at times may be allowed to take a doctoral seminar for master’s credit. Students should contact the Associate Dean of Research Doctoral Programs for guidance and approval. (See the section “Master’s Credit for a Doctoral Seminar.”)

Manual for Research Doctoral Programs

Following acceptance into a research doctoral program, students should download a copy of the Manual for Research Doctoral Programs from the Research Doctoral Programs area of the seminary website (nobts.edu/ research). This manual is the official handbook for research doctoral programs. It includes information on current procedures and policies. Students are notified of updates as appropriate.

Style Guides

The official style guides for NOBTS research doctoral programs are the current editions of the SBL Handbook of Style (biblical studies only); the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (counseling only); A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations by Kate L. Turabian; and A Manual of Style published by the University of Chicago Press. Questions concerning form matters peculiar to NOBTS may be addressed to the Office of Research Doctoral Programs.

Established Program Dates

The following are general dates for program components. See the calendar of events for the research doctoral programs for specific dates for the upcoming academic year.

Qualifying exam

Wed.-Fri. during the fourth week before classes begin

Dissertation submission/Application for graduation

Oct. 1/Mar. 1

Application for qualifying exam

Nov. 1/Apr. 1

Research proposal submission

Nov. 1/Apr. 1

Research proposal approval

Last day of semester

Fees for Doctoral Students

Fees, effective August 1 each year, are listed in the “Graduate Student Fees” section of this catalog. Students who are not members of Southern Baptist churches should note the fees for non-Southern Baptists.

Requirements for Graduation

In order to graduate from the seminary, students must meet all academic requirements set forth in this catalog, settle all financial obligations to the seminary, and maintain high standards of moral and ethical conduct. The faculty or any appropriate committee of the faculty may at any time advise the President that a student evidences spiritual, ethical, emotional, psychological, or attitudinal deficiencies that in the judgment of the faculty disqualify the student for continued study at the seminary. The student may appeal this determination to the President. The decision of the President shall be final.

Participation in graduation exercises is required of all students unless permission is granted to graduate in absentia. Requests for permission to graduate in absentia should be made in writing to the Registrar. Permission is granted only in emergency cases.

Transfer of Credit

There is a possibility of transferring a minimal number of doctoral-level courses completed at another accredited institution prior to admission. Applicants who believe they qualify should contact the Associate Dean of Research Doctoral Programs during the application process. Students who desire to take a doctoral-level course while enrolled at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary as master’s or nondegree students should contact the Associate Dean regarding approval, which must be granted prior to enrollment in the course.

International Students

Research doctoral program applicants whose primary spoken language is not English should follow the instructions in the International Students section of this catalog. The International Student Advisor for the seminary is Dr. Paul Gregoire. Applicants may contact him by phone at 504.282.4455, ext. 3337, or 1.800.NOBTS.01, ext. 3337 or by e-mail at pgregoire@nobts.edu. However, please note that WES transcript evaluations for master’s degrees must be course by course.

Degree Equivalency

Applicants who do not hold the appropriate prerequisite degree should contact the Office of Research Doctoral Programs for information concerning degree equivalency requirements.

Nondegree Students

Students may apply to take one doctoral seminar as a nondegree student. An individual desiring nondegree status must make application as a nondegree student. Nondegree students may be admitted to one doctoral seminar provided they have met the GPA and GRE requirements and the degree prerequisites for the major in which they plan to take the seminar. In addition, students must complete all prerequisites for the seminar.

The academic division in which the study is to be done must give a positive recommendation. Final approval will be given by the Research Doctoral Oversight Committee.

The seminary is under no obligation to accept the credit earned by a nondegree student as credit toward any doctoral program should the student decide to apply for doctoral work at a later time.

Financial Assistance

Southern Baptist Doctoral Teaching Program
The Southern Baptist Doctoral Teaching Program provides financial assistance and teaching opportunities to qualified doctoral students through funds generated by the Cooperative Program of the Southern Baptist Convention. Students who qualify for the program are guaranteed at least one teaching opportunity during their doctoral studies. For more information about the program or for application forms, contact the Office of Research Doctoral Programs.

Robert S. Magee Doctoral Scholar
The Robert S. Magee Doctoral Scholar award is made possible by a generous donation from the estate of Dr. Robert S. Magee, a graduate of New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary who served the Lord faithfully for many decades in pastorates in Mississippi and Louisiana, and also was chairman of the Board of Trustees of NOBTS from 1975 to 1983. This two-semester award is granted primarily with regard to academic excellence and scholarly potential. The Associate Dean of Research Doctoral Programs, chairs of the academic divisions, Dean of Graduate Studies, and Provost are involved in determining recipients of the award.

Teaching and Research Assistantships
A limited number of teaching assistantships are available on a regular basis. Duties include grading and limited teaching opportunities. Interested persons should contact individual professors or the chair of the division in which the student wishes to work. Research assistantships are available as required by the research projects of the faculty.

Research Doctoral Fellowship Program
The Research Doctoral Fellowship Program provides for most or all tuition and fees for outstanding doctoral students for up to four years from entrance into the doctoral program. Recipients must remain in good standing as determined by the Associate Dean for Research Doctoral Programs, and preference is given to residential students. Fellowships currently available include the following:

  • J. Duncan Boyd III Memorial Fellowship in Old Testament and Hebrew

  • Lucille and Harold Harris PhD Fellowship in Christian Counseling

  • Dr. Chuck Kelley PhD Fellowship for Evangelism Studies

  • Dr. Rhonda Kelley PhD Fellowship in Women’s Leadership

  • Thomas S. and Mary Wheeler Messer Fellowship in New Testament and Greek

  • Charles Ray Pigott Fellowship in Apologetics

  • Charles Ray Pigott Fellowship for Minority Students

  • C. C. Randall Research Fellowship for the Leavell Center for Evangelism and Church Growth

  • Milton and Charlotte Williams Fellowship in Preaching

Visiting Student

A student who is enrolled in a doctoral program at another accredited seminary, college, or university may enroll in doctoral seminars for credit or audit at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary as a visiting student.

  • An individual desiring visiting student status must make application to the Associate Dean as a nondegree special student. Other items needed include the following:

    a. A letter to the Associate Dean of Research Doctoral Programs stating the desire and rationale for doing seminar work at NOBTS

    b. A letter from the appropriate academic officer at the student’s institution indicating approval to do seminar work at NOBTS

    The Associate Dean will forward a copy of the application to the division chairperson.

  • The student must meet all prerequisites for enrollment required of other doctoral students in the seminar.

  • The division will examine the student’s background and preparation and make a recommendation to the Associate Dean, who will submit the application to the Research Doctoral Oversight Committee.

  • The Research Doctoral Oversight Committee will approve or disapprove the application for visiting student status. The Associate Dean will inform the student of the committee’s decision in writing.

  • The visiting student must pay the applicable matriculation and student fees at the level of doctoral students.

  • The visiting student may request a doctoral carrel, which will be assigned subject to availability.

Visiting Scholar

A professor who is employed at another accredited seminary, college, or university and who has attained the EdD, PhD, ThD, or the equivalent may apply to New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary for the status of visiting scholar.

  • An individual desiring visiting scholar status should submit a request to the Associate Dean. The Associate Dean will forward a copy of the request to the chairperson of the division in which the scholar wishes to pursue study. The division will consider the request and make a recommendation to the Research Doctoral Oversight Committee. The Associate Dean will inform the applicant of the committee’s decision in writing and send copies of appropriate materials to the Registrar.

  • A visiting scholar may audit doctoral seminars and master’s-level courses (with the permission of the professor) without the payment of fees.

  • A visiting scholar who desires credit for a seminar will need to register as a special student. The individual will be charged a matriculation fee equal to one-half of the normal semester cost for doctoral students.

  • A visiting scholar may apply for student housing through the normal channels of the Housing Office.

  • A visiting scholar may request a doctoral carrel, which will be assigned subject to availability.

At present, the NOBTS visiting scholar program does not provide for issuance of the J-form required for international scholars to obtain a visiting scholar visa.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE AND GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION

The grade point average (GPA) and the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) verbal and analytical writing scores will be considered on the following five-point sliding scale. For the application to be accepted, the individual must have a combined score of “0” or higher on the three components. Scores can be no older than 5 years.

 

-2

-1

0

+1

+2

GPA

below 3.0

3.0-3.25

3.26-3.5

3.51-3.75

3.76-4.0

GRE Verbal

below 146

146-152

153-156

157-160

above 160

GRE Writing

below 3.5

3.5

4.0

4.5-5.0

5.5-6.0

Although not included in the above calculation, the quantitative score will be considered in the overall evaluation of the applicant. The institutional code for New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary is 6472.

PhD Purpose and Program Outcomes

The Doctor of Philosophy degree at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary is a research degree designed to prepare qualified students for teaching in colleges, universities, and seminaries; for holding administrative positions; for working in the boards, agencies, and commissions of the Southern Baptist Convention; and for providing specialized ministry leadership.

Graduates of the Doctor of Philosophy degree program will be able to do the following:

  • Demonstrate mastery of a body of knowledge related to a chosen field of study

  • Design, implement, and report research

  • Impart knowledge of the chosen field through teaching and other communication skills

  • Express commitment to the vocation of theological scholarship

Majors and Minors
Majors are offered in following areas:

  • Biblical Exposition 

  • Biblical Interpretation

  • Christian Apologetics

  • Christian Education

  • Christian Leadership

  • Counselor Education and Supervision

  • Evangelism

  • New Testament

  • Old Testament

  • Theology

Minors are offered in all of the above fields, as well as Biblical Backgrounds, Christian Ethics, Church History, Missions, and Philosophy of Religion.

Associate Deans for respective majors may be contacted at 504.282.4455 or 1.800.NOBTS.01.

Dr. Archie W. England (aengland@nobts.edu): New Testament, Old Testament, Biblical Interpretation
Dr. Ian F. Jones (ijones@nobts.edu): Counselor Education and Supervision
Dr. Adam Hughes (ahughes@nobts.edu): Biblical Exposition, Christian Education, Christian Leadership, and Evangelism
Dr. Lloyd A. Harsch (lharsch@nobts.edu): Christian Apologetics, Theology

Characteristics of Applicants
Applicants should manifest consistent habits of study, an unusual degree of independence, an understanding of the basic techniques of research, superior intellectual capacities, and the willingness to pay the price in time and isolation required for distinguished scholarly work. In addition, consideration is given to the bearing of health, finances, personality traits, and responsibilities other than graduate study upon the fitness of students for scholarly research.

Admission  Requirements

Degree Prerequisites and Hours in Major
An applicant must hold a bachelor’s degree from a college or university accredited by an agency related to the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA). The master’s requirements for specific majors are noted below. 

Biblical Exposition, Christian Apologetics, Evangelism, New Testament, Old Testament, and Theology majors: The MDiv degree, the MA degree, or the equivalent in the appropriate area of study from a theological institution accredited by the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada (ATS). Equivalency will be based upon the courses included in the MDiv or MA degree program in the appropriate area. Applicants must have completed 12 semester hours of master’s-level courses in the respective major.

Theology major with church history concentration: The MDiv degree, the MA degree, or the equivalent in the appropriate area of study from a theological institution accredited by the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada (ATS). Equivalency will be based upon the courses included in the MDiv or MA degree program in the appropriate area. Applicants must have completed 18 semester hours of master’s-level courses in church history and theology combined.

Biblical Interpretation major: The MDiv degree, the MA degree, or the equivalent in the appropriate area of study from a theological institution accredited by the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada (ATS). Equivalency will be based upon the courses included in the MDiv or MA degree program in the appropriate area. Applicants must have completed 24 semester hours of master’s-level biblical studies courses.

Christian Education major: The MDiv degree in Christian Education, the MACE degree, or the equivalent from a theological institution accredited by the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada (ATS). Applicants should contact the Office of Research Doctoral Programs regarding equivalency, which includes biblical and theological, basic ministerial, and Christian education courses as well as course work in research design and statistics for the social sciences. Generally competency is measured by transcripted hours in these courses.

Christian Leadership major: The MDiv degree, the MA degree, or the equivalent in the appropriate area of study from a theological institution accredited by the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada (ATS). Equivalency will be based on the courses included in the MDiv or MA degree programs in the appropriate area. Applicants should contact the Office of Research Doctoral Programs regarding equivalency, which includes biblical and theological, basic ministerial, and/or discipleship and ministry leadership course work. Applicants must have completed 12 semester hours of master’s-level courses in the area of concentration.

Counselor Education and Supervision major: The MDiv degree with a Specialization in Marriage and Family Counseling, an MA degree in mental health, or the equivalent from a theological institution (preferably ATS accredited, but minimally by an agency related to the CHEA). Applicants must have completed master’s-level biblical studies, theology, and counseling courses comparable to those included in the MA in Counseling with a specialization in Marriage and Family Counseling or MA in Counseling with a specialization in Clinical Mental Health.

Entrance Exams

Entrance exams are required for all majors.

Research Paper

The applicant must submit a research paper from the master’s program for review by the division. If no paper is available, the applicant should contact the Associate Dean of Research Doctoral Programs for guidance.

Languages, Research Statistics and Methods

Biblical Exposition: Prior to admission, applicants must have completed a minimum of 6 semester hours of graduate-level biblical languages (Hebrew and/or Greek).   

Biblical Interpretation major: Prior to admission, applicants must have completed a minimum of 9 semester hours of master’s-level Greek and 9 semester hours of master’s-level Hebrew (for NOBTS students these courses would include NTGK6300 Intermediate Greek Grammar and OTHB6300 Intermediate Hebrew Grammar, and advanced exegesis courses), and 9 semester hours of French, German, or Latin.

Christian Apologetics major: Prior to admission, applicants must have completed a minimum of 9 semester hours of master’s-level Greek and/or Hebrew. Prior to the qualifying exam, applicants must have completed a minimum of 3 semester hours of formal logic.

Christian Education major: Prior to admission, applicants must have completed a minimum of 6 semester hours of research statistics. Upon request, the division faculty will evaluate undergraduate courses to determine which, if any, apply toward the research statistics requirement. Courses considered would be those similar in nature to NOBTS graduate courses CEST6300 Introduction to Educational Research and Statistics and CEST9300 Educational Research and Statistics. Applicants may choose to take CEST6300 Introduction to Research and Statistics during preresidency and seek approval to take CEST9300 Educational Research and Statistics within the first year after admission into the program.

Christian Leadership, Evangelism majors:  Prior to admission, applicants must have completed a minimum of 6 semester hours of graduate-level biblical languages (Hebrew and/or Greek), 6 semester hours of a nonbiblical language (French, German, Latin, or Spanish), or 6 semester hours of graduate-level research statistics. Statistics courses considered would be those similar in nature to NOBTS graduate courses CEST6300 Introduction to Educational Research & Statistics and CEST9300 Educational Research and Statistics. 

Counselor Education and Supervision major: Prior to admission, applicants must complete a minimum of 3 semester hours of research statistics. Upon request, the division faculty will evaluate graduate courses to determine which, if any, apply toward the research statistics requirement. Requests must be submitted in writing with the application. Courses considered would be those similar in nature to the NOBTS graduate course COUN6374 Scientific Research and Program Evaluation.

New Testament major: Prior to admission, applicants must have completed a minimum of 12 semester hours of master’s-level Greek and 12 semester hours of master’s-level Hebrew (for NOBTS students these courses would include NTGK6300 Intermediate Greek Grammar, OTHB6300 Intermediate Hebrew Grammar, and advanced exegesis courses), and 9 semester hours of German or Latin. Prior to taking the qualifying examination, New Testament majors must have completed NTGK6390 Textual Criticism of the Greek New Testament and NTGK6393 Advanced Greek Grammar, or the equivalent. By the time of the oral comprehensive examination, the student is required to have competency in a second nonbiblical language: 5 semester hours of German, French, or Latin. The second language is chosen by the student in consultation with the guidance committee chairperson in relation to the student’s area of dissertation research.

Old Testament major: Prior to admission, applicants must have completed a minimum of 12 semester hours of master’s-level Greek and 12 semester hours of master’s-level Hebrew (for NOBTS students these courses would include NTGK6300 Intermediate Greek Grammar, OTHB6300 Intermediate Hebrew Grammar, and advanced exegesis courses), and 9 semester hours of German. By the time of the oral comprehensive examination, the student is required to have competency in a second nonbiblical language: 5 semester hours of French or Latin. The second language is chosen by the student in consultation with the guidance committee chairperson in relation to the student’s area of dissertation research.

Theology major, theology major with church history concentration: Prior to admission, applicants must have completed a minimum of 9 semester hours of master’s-level Greek and 9 semester hours of master’s-level Hebrew (for NOBTS students these courses would include NTGK6300 Intermediate Greek Grammar and OTHB6300 Intermediate Hebrew Grammar, and advanced exegesis courses), and 9 semester hours of French, German, or Latin. Theology majors may request an alternative nonbiblical research language. Applicants making this request must seek approval in writing from the Division of Theological and Historical Studies, indicating both the rationale for research in the alternate language as well as the primary and secondary sources available in that language.

For all majors: Course credits that are to be considered for meeting the nonbiblical language or research statistics requirement may not be more than 7 years old. The division will consider requests concerning unique circumstances. In addition to transcripted course credits, competency in a nonbiblical language can be verified by testing arranged through the Office of Research Doctoral Programs.

Division Interview

Applicants normally are required to come to campus for an interview with the division faculty related to the proposed area of major study. The interview focuses on one’s conversion experience, call to ministry, family relationships, reasons for pursuing the doctoral degree, interests and reading in the proposed field of study, and other concerns that may enable the faculty to know the applicant better and to ascertain his or her potential for advanced studies.

Program Overview

The PhD curriculum for the Counselor Education and Supervision major consists of 7 semester-length PhD seminars, 4 supervised reading colloquia, Introduction to Doctoral Research and Writing, Teaching in Higher Education, statistics (quantitative or qualitative), a practicum, 2 internships, a written Qualifying Examination (halfway through seminar work), an Oral Comprehensive Examination (at the completion of seminar work), Prospectus Development, and the submission and defense of a dissertation.

The PhD curriculum for all other majors consists of 8 semester-length PhD seminars (in designated areas, depending on the major), 4 supervised reading colloquia, Introduction to Doctoral Research and Writing, Teaching in Higher Education, a written Qualifying Examination (halfway through seminar work), an Oral Comprehensive Examination (at the completion of seminar work), Prospectus Development, and the submission and defense of a dissertation.

The PhD program is divided into three stages: PhD residency/ThM candidacy, PhD senior residency, and PhD candidacy. The student enters the PhD senior residency stage following the completion of the Qualifying Examination and 34 semester hours of PhD work for students majoring in Counselor Education and Supervision or 33 semester hours of PhD work for students in all other majors. The student enters the PhD candidacy stage after completion of the Oral Comprehensive Examination.

A student’s program is guided by a faculty advisor during the residency/ThM candidacy stage and by a two-member guidance committee during the senior residency and candidacy stages. Faculty guidance assignments are made by the Associate Dean in consultation with the chairperson of the major division.

A student may take no more than two PhD seminars per semester. In addition, a student may take a supervised reading colloquium and other program elements. Full-time students generally can complete the program in 3 1/2 to 4 years. A full-time student would finish PhD seminars after four semesters or 2 years. Students are eligible to take the Qualifying Examination after completing four to five seminars (at least two in the major field) and two supervised reading colloquia. In addition, New Testament majors must have completed Advanced Greek Grammar and Textual Criticism of the Greek New Testament prior to taking the Qualifying Examination. The Oral Comprehensive Examination is administered after the completion of all course work, with the possible exception of Prospectus Development.

After completing the Qualifying Examination and required number of hours in the PhD Residency/ThM Candidacy stage, students can apply for the ThM degree in their broad area of study: Biblical Studies, Christian Education, Church and Community Ministries, Pastoral Ministries, or Theological and Historical Studies.

Students who are engaged in full-time ministry are strongly encouraged to take only one seminar per semester, thus lengthening the program considerably. The program must be completed within seven years.

Students participating through synchronous interactive video will need an ethernet connection (hardwire) and headphones with a microphone. Wi-Fi is not encouraged because bandwidth issues can cause disruptions.

Preresidency

Students who hold a master’s degree but need a year or less of additional leveling courses can apply for the Preresidency stage of the PhD program by indicating on the application form that they are applying for Preresidency. Preresidents are eligible to apply for scholarships and campus housing with no minimum hour requirement.

Preresidents taking leveling courses only online need not submit personal evaluations or health and immunization forms. However, all application items must be submitted by the application deadline of the semester prior to desired entrance into the residency stage of the PhD program.

Options for Students Outside of the New Orleans Area

Major

When do seminars meet on campus?

Can I connect from

my home or office?

Biblical Interpretation Christian Apologetics New Testament

Old Testament Theology

Weekly/Biweekly

Possible

Biblical Exposition Christian Education Christian Leadership Evangelism

Monthly

(4 times a semester)

Possible

Counseling

Monthly

(3 times a semester)

Possible

Degree Requirements

PhD Preresidency

(One year or less of leveling)

PhD Residency/ThM Candidacy (33 hours)

course

hours

Introduction to Doctoral Research and Writing

3

2 Supervised Reading Colloquia (3 hours each)

6

5 PhD seminars (4 hours each)

20

Teaching in Higher Education

3

Qualifying Examination

1

Doctoral Orientation (includes COOP9000)

no credit

PhD Senior Residency (23 hours)

course

hours

3 PhD seminars (4 hours each)

12

2 Supervised Reading Colloquia (3 hours each)

6

Dissertation Research Proposal approval

1

Prospectus Development

3

Oral Comprehensive Examination

1

PhD Candidacy (8 hours)

course

hours

Dissertation Prospectus approval

1

Dissertation Research and Writing

6

Dissertation Defense

1

Total Required: 64 hours

Requirements for Specific Majors

Biblical Exposition, Christian Apologetics, Evangelism, New Testament, Old Testament, Theology majors:

  • Five seminars in the respective major

  • Two seminars in a minor

  • One seminar elective

  • Four colloquia in the major

Biblical Interpretation major:

  • Five seminars in the major

    • Three core seminars: Biblical Backgrounds in Interpretation, Biblical Hermeneutics, and Biblical Theology

    • One Old Testament seminar

    • One New Testament seminar

  • Two seminars in a minor

  • One seminar elective

  • Two colloquia in biblical interpretation, one colloquium in Old Testament, and one colloquium in New Testament

Christian Education major:

  • Four core seminars in Christian education

    • History and Philosophy of Christian Education

    • Educational Psychology or Human Growth and Development

    • Discipleship and Spiritual Formation or Family Ministry in Church Life

    • Principles of Administration or Higher Education Leadership

  • Three elective seminars in Christian education and one seminar from any other division, or two elective seminars in Christian education and two seminars from any other divisions (with advising and approval by the chair of the Division of Discipleship and Ministry Leadership)

  • Four colloquia in Christian education

Christian Leadership major:

  • Pastoral Ministries Division concentration

    • Two core seminars: Strategic Leadership and Organizational Change, and Building and Managing an Effective Organization

    • Three of the following Pastoral Ministries Division concentration seminars: Pastoral Leadership, Studies in Classical and Contemporary Pastoral Theology, Church Revitalization and Strategic Leadership, Strategic Proclamation, Conflict Resolution and Crisis Management, Biblical and Theological Basis for Christian Leadership

    • Two seminars in a minor

    • One seminar elective

    • Four colloquia in Christian leadership

  • Discipleship and Ministry Leadership Division concentration

    • Two core seminars: Strategic Leadership and Organizational Change, and Building and Managing an Effective Organization

    • Three of the following Discipleship and Ministry Leadership

      Division seminars: Principles of Administration, Higher Education Leadership, Contemporary Context of Christian Education, Issues in Risk Management

    • Two seminars in a minor

    • One seminar elective

    • Four colloquia in Christian leadership

  • Combination concentration

    • Two core seminars: Strategic Leadership and Organizational Change, and Building and Managing an Effective Organization

    • Three seminars in any combination from the Pastoral Ministries Division concentration and the Discipleship and Ministry Leadership Division concentration

    • Two seminars in a minor

    • One seminar elective

    • Four colloquia in Christian leadership

Degree Requirements
PhD in Counselor Education and Supervision

PhD Preresidency

(One year or less of leveling)

PhD Residency/ThM Candidacy (34 hours)

course

hours

Introduction to Doctoral Research and Writing

3

2 Supervised Reading Colloquia (3 hours each)

6

5 PhD seminars (3 hours each)

15

Teaching in Higher Education

3

Doctoral Practicum and Doctoral Internship 1 (3 hours each)

6

Qualifying Examination

1

Doctoral Orientation (includes COOP9000)

no credit

PhD Senior Residency (23 hours)

course

hours

2 PhD seminars (3 hours each)

6

2 Supervised Reading Colloquia (3 hours each)

6

Doctoral Internship 2

3

Dissertation Research Proposal approval

1

Quantitative or Qualitative Statistics

3

Prospectus Development

3

Oral Comprehensive Examination

1

PhD Candidacy (8 hours)

course

hours

Dissertation Prospectus approval

1

Dissertation Research and Writing

6

Dissertation Defense

1

Total Required: 65 hours

Counselor Education and Supervision major:

  • Seven core seminars: Biblical and Theological Foundations of Counseling, Contemporary Approaches in Counseling, Counseling in the Church, Counseling Supervision Theory and Practice, Neuropsychology and Psychopharmacology, Program Evaluation and Research Design, and Social Problems and Advocacy

  • Four colloquia

  • Quantitative or qualitative statistics

  • Practicum (counseling clinical practice of 40 direct and 100 indirect hours)

  • Internships (1-hour biweekly supervision plus group supervision)

    --select three of the following five areas: advocacy and leadership, teaching, supervision, research, and counseling.

In addition, students must meet the equivalency for licensure as professional counselors and/or clinical membership in AAMFT before the oral defense of the dissertation.

Theology major with concentration in church history:

  • Five seminars in theology

  • Two seminars in church history

  • One elective

  • Four colloquia

  • Two colloquia in theology

  • Two colloquia in church history

The dissertation can be in either theology or church history.

Directed Study

A directed study provides a unique opportunity for a student to work one- on-one with a professor. Directed studies enable a student (1) to engage in specialized research under a professor’s supervision or (2) to cover an area not included in the regular seminar offerings during the student’s scheduled seminar work. Contact the Associate Dean of Research Doctoral Programs concerning the procedure for submitting a proposal.

Dissertation Requirements

Doctoral candidates must write a dissertation that demonstrates the candidate’s ability to do independent and original research, mastery of a research methodology, competency to report logically the results of the research, expertise in presenting the research in acceptable style, and contribution to the academic discipline. The dissertation may contain no fewer than 25,000 nor more than 50,000 words unless otherwise authorized by the student’s guidance committee. The approval of a dissertation topic goes through several stages:

  • Approval of a research proposal by the division (must be approved before the oral comprehensive examination)

  • Completion of RDOC9303 Prospectus Development

  • Review of a prospectus by the Research Doctoral Oversight Committee (cannot be done until after the student passes the Oral Comprehensive Examination)

  • Following ReDOC review, approval of a prospectus by the guidance committee at least four months before the dissertation is presented Students are required to use the style guides approved by the seminary faculty.

Four plain-paper copies of the completed dissertation (unbound in four separate boxes) as well as the Dissertation Fee and Order Form and the Graduation Application must be submitted to the Office of Research Doctoral Programs by the March 1 or October 1 deadline. Appropriate dissertation and diploma fees must be paid at the time of submission.

Following the dissertation defense, the student will need to work with the guidance committee chairperson to make any changes the committee might require. The student will submit a pdf of the revised document to the guidance committee chairperson, who will approve the pdf and forward it to the ReDOC office for final approval for submission to ProQuest.

If the dissertation is rejected following an unsatisfactory dissertation defense and if the guidance committee looks with favor upon its resubmission, a period of three months must elapse before it may be presented again. The student would register as a writing candidate and pay full tuition.

If the dissertation is rejected for form, style, and/or minor content reasons following a satisfactory dissertation defense and if the guidance committee looks with favor upon its resubmission, the dissertation may be presented again no sooner than two months after the dissertation defense and no later than two months prior to the anticipated graduation date. The student would register for Program Continuance and pay a reduced tuition. In either case permission to resubmit the dissertation does not involve a commitment as to the time of graduation.

PhD Registration

Students enrolled in doctoral programs must maintain active status by registering and paying the required fees each semester until graduation. Because PhD students are expected to attend all class sessions, students must be enrolled in courses before the first class session. Failure to be registered for a program status, such as Program Proficiency or Writing Candidate, and pay enrollment fees by the semester drop/add deadline will result in termination from the program.

Dropping a PhD Block-Scheduled Course

PhD students are expected to attend all class sessions. Students may drop a PhD block-scheduled seminar, colloquium, or other course before the second class meeting. A class meeting is defined as one half-day session. To drop a course, students must contact the Office of Research Doctoral Programs.

PhD Courses and Seminars

COOP9000 An Introduction to NOBTS, the SBC, and the Cooperative Program (no credit) Ray, Riley
This core curriculum course offered in conjunction with Introduction to Doctoral Research and Writing is required to be taken in the first year. The course will acquaint students with a brief history of NOBTS, the SBC, and the Cooperative Program, as well as their current leadership and operation. In this course students also will gain an understanding of the significance and relationship of the Cooperative Program to the SBC and NOBTS.

RDOC9300 Introduction to Doctoral Research and Writing (3 hours) Ray, Riley, Rivers, Dean
In this course students will be introduced to the literature and techniques of doctoral research. Special attention will be given to the development of research proposals and the presentation of research, including individual guidance in the form and style of research writing. The course must be taken during the student’s first year in the program.

RDOC9302 Teaching in Higher Education (3 hours) Peavey, Stone, Vandercook, Yount
Students in this course will develop an undergraduate or graduate course of their own choosing, from the submission of a course rationale and description through the development of the course syllabus and lesson plans. In addition, they will construct a teaching portfolio prepared to present to an institute of higher learning consisting of a personal philisophy of teaching, a curriculum vita, properly written lesson plans, a syllabus for higher theological education, and a video documentation of teaching.

RDOC9303 Prospectus Development (3 hours) Ray, Riley, Rivers
In this one-week course students are given guidance in the development and writing of a prospectus for the dissertation. Prerequisite: a research proposal must be submitted to the student’s guidance committee by the April 1/November 1 deadline. The research proposal must be approved by the division of study by the last day of the semester.

RDOC9010 Program Proficiency
This is not a course per se. Students in the residency/ThM candidacy or senior residency stage of the PhD degree program should register for this component in semesters in which no course work is taken. Each semester after completion of the Oral Comprehensive Examination, students will be registered for dissertation writing in the appropriate major.

RDOC9011 Inactive Status
This is not a course per se. Students who have prior approval from the Research Doctoral Oversight Committee to cease all work on the doctoral program for the semester will be registered for inactive status. See the Manual for Research Doctoral Programs for procedures.

RDOC9000 Program Continuance
This is not a course per se. Students who have prior approval from their guidance committee following a successful dissertation defense can continue editing the dissertation for one semester while registered for Program Continuance.

Biblical Backgrounds

BSBB9401 The Dead Sea Scrolls (4 hours) Cole
Research includes historical background and description of the Qumran cult and problems relating to the significance and dating of the Scrolls. Special emphasis is placed on a theological analysis of the nonbiblical scriptures of the Dead Sea library on subjects such as God, humanity, and eschatology. Meaningful comparisons are sought in the Qumran view of angels, sin, forgiveness, ethics, and messianic expectation with Jewish and Christian views of the Old and New Testaments and the intertestamental period. Also can serve as an Old or New Testament or biblical interpretation seminar.

BSBB9402 Archaeology in the Ancient Near East (4 hours) Cole
A survey is made of the political, socioeconomic, and religious aspects of ancient Near Eastern cultures in order to contextualize the history of Israel from its formative Patriarchal to Post-Exilic periods. Findings from archaeological excavations in Egypt, Asia Minor, Mesopotamia, and the Levant are highlighted so as to enhance the student’s understanding of the literary, cultural, and physical environments of the Old Testament world. Also can serve as an Old Testament seminar.

BSBB9403 Studies in Syro-Palestinian Archaeology (4 hours) Cole
Current issues and discoveries in the field of Palestinian archaeology which supplement and illuminate the study of the Old Testament are examined. Major finds from the Neolithic through Early Roman periods are discussed. The study includes an assessment of the current status of the field of biblical archaeology, Neolithic/Chalcolithic research, the Early Bronze Age, the Patriarchal period, issues in the Exodus/Conquest Settlement period, the kingdoms of David and Solomon, and the international situation in the Iron Ages-Divided Kingdoms, Persian, and Hellenistic/ Herodian periods. Also can serve as an Old Testament seminar.

BSBB9404 Studies in Greco-Roman Archaeology (4 hours) Cole
This seminar is designed to orient the student in the origins and developments in the Greek and Roman worlds from Neolithic to Byzantine periods. Special emphasis is given to the manner in which archaeology has impacted the understanding of historical, sociocultural, technological, economic, and religious aspects of the Greco-Roman world. The goal of the study is to provide a broad-based background for understanding the Greek and Roman impact on the Old and New Testaments, as well as the Early Church, from 700 BC to AD 340. Also can serve as an Old or New Testament or biblical interpretation seminar.

BSBB9405 Readings in NW Semitic Literature (4 hours) Cole
This seminar is designed to introduce the student to the extant literature of the Northwest Semitic language family. The study includes a comparative analysis of Northwest Semitic grammar, syntax, and other linguistic issues. Epigraphic materials in Hebrew, Ugaritic, Phoenician, Aramaic, Syriac, Moabite, Ammonite, and Edomite are translated and interpreted. Also can serve as an Old or New Testament or biblical interpretation seminar.

BSDS9400 Directed Study in Biblical Backgrounds (4 hours) Faculty

Biblical Exposition

BEXP9401 Patristic and Reformation Preaching (4 hours) Hughes, Phelps, Rice
In this seminar, significant developments in preaching during the Patristic and Reformation periods will be explored through contextual and biographical research as well as analysis of sermons. Attention will be given to such preachers as Augustine, Chrysostom, Luther, and Calvin.

BEXP9403 British Preaching (4 hours) Hughes, Phelps, Rice
A study is made of the classical age of British preaching, the preaching of the Evangelical Revival, and trends and characteristics of 19th-century preaching.

BEXP9404 American Preaching (4 hours) Hughes, Ogea, Phelps, Rice
This seminar is concerned with a selected number of American preachers and their preaching. Some time is given to the study of special movements and circumstances that significantly influenced American preaching.

BEXP9405 A Survey of Expository Preaching (4 hours) Hughes, Phelps, Rice
Primary attention is given to types of expository preaching and when and where these types were dominant.

BEXP9406 The Art of Biblical Exposition (4 hours) Hughes, Phelps, Rice
A study is made of the development of the art of preaching, giving special attention to definitive works.

BEXP9407 Elements of Style in Contemporary Biblical Exposition (4 hours) Hughes, Phelps, Rice
A detailed consideration is given to those elements of expression leading to excellence in preaching. The study is to be based on examples provided by selected contemporary preachers.

BEXP9408 Advanced Biblical Exposition (4 hours) Hughes, Phelps, Rice
The work of the seminar involves studying various biblical areas, investigating hermeneutical approaches, studying sermon designs from the biblical area from other approaches, and building sermons from a selected biblical area.

BEXP9409 A Survey of Evangelistic Preaching (4 hours) Nix
This seminar is a study of the factors involved in evangelistic preaching. An investigation of various approaches to evangelistic preaching, past and present, will be included in the study. Also can serve as an evangelism seminar.

BEXP9411 Preaching Lectureships (4 hours) Hughes, Phelps, Rice
In this seminar the Lyman Beecher Lectures will be studied along with other significant lectureships on preaching. Major attention will be given to selected lectures and the context in which they were given.

BEXP9412 Studies in Classical and Contemporary Pastoral Theology (4 hours) Ogea
This seminar studies the work of significant pastors, past and present, in regard to their times, ministry, person, and contributions to the field of pastoral theology. The study also will include an investigation of important issues and problems faced by these pastors, in order to identify evident trends, practical principles, and helpful resources which can shape effective pastoral ministry. Also can be taken as PMCL9403.

BEXP9413 Pastoral Leadership (4 hours) Ogea
This seminar examines current and classic leadership theory from a pastoral viewpoint. Students will utilize leadership theory research to analyze specific pastoral leadership styles in both historic and contemporary examples. The seminar will include the evaluation of various pastoral leadership models from a biblical perspective. Also can be taken as PMCL9402.

BEXP9414 Old Testament Exposition (4 hours) Phelps, England
In this seminar the student will research various Old Testament genres, investigating contextual, intertextual, and exegetical factors, hermeneutical issues, and expositional sermon approaches. Attention will be given directly to the biblical text.

BEXP9415 New Testament Exposition (4 hours) Phelps, Price
In this seminar the student will research various New Testament genres, investigating contextual, intertextual, and exegetical factors, hermeneutical issues, and expositional sermon approaches. Attention will be given directly to the biblical text.

BEXP9416 Strategic Proclamation (4 hours) Ogea
This seminar will involve researching the application of organizational leadership theory through strategic proclamation in both historic and contemporary church and denominational contexts. Students will examine planned proclamation by significant expositors in a variety of church and denominational contexts, such as church revitalization, church planting, church relocation, congregational and denominational crises, or other strategic situations. Also can be taken as PMCL9405.

BEDS9400 Directed Study in Biblical Exposition (4 hours) Faculty

BESR9301 Supervised Reading Colloquium: History and Theology of Preaching (3 hours)

BESR9302 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Biblical Exposition (3 hours)

BESR9303 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Homiletical Developments (3 hours)

BESR9304 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Contextual Issues in Biblical Exposition (3 hours)

BEQE9100 Qualifying Examination in Biblical Exposition (1 hour)

BERP9100 Research Proposal Approval (1 hour)

BEOE9100 Oral Exam in Biblical Exposition (1 hour)

BEPA9100 Dissertation Prospectus Approval (1 hour)

BEWC9600 Writing Candidate in Biblical Exposition (6 hours)

BEDD9100 Dissertation Defense (1 hour)

Biblical Interpretation

BIBB9401 Biblical Backgrounds in Interpretation (4 hours) Cole
This seminar is designed to address the hermeneutical principles and resources for integrating biblical backgrounds materials in interpreting the Old and New Testaments. Resources from archaeology, historical geography, social and cultural settings, ancient Near Eastern and Greco-Roman literature, and others will be explored. Current issues and discoveries in the field of archaeology that supplement and illuminate the study of the Bible are examined.

BIHM9401 Biblical Hermeneutics (4 hours) Faculty
This course explores the history of biblical interpretation, genres, hermeneutical principles, and major contributors in the discipline. The course includes an overview of the history of interpretation and traditional methodologies with a focus on current applications of critical, biblical interpretation. The course addresses the hermeneutical concerns deriving from text-centered, author-centered, and reader-centered approaches, especially noting how each may apply to current settings in biblical interpretation. This course prepares the student with an overarching understanding of the field of biblical interpretation and provides an awareness of methodological approaches for biblical research and investigation.

BIDS9400 Directed Study in Biblical Interpretation (4 hours) Faculty

BISR9301 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Old Testament Overview and Backgrounds (3 hours)

BISR9302 Supervised Reading Colloquium: New Testament Overview and Backgrounds (3 hours)

BIQE9100 Qualifying Examination in Biblical Interpretation (1 hour)

BIRP9100 Research Proposal Approval (1 hour)

BIOE9100 Oral Exam in Biblical Interpretation (1 hour)

BIPA9100 Dissertation Prospectus Approval (1 hour)

BIWC9600 Writing Candidate in Biblical Interpretation (6 hours)

BIDD9100 Dissertation Defense (1 hour)

Students majoring in biblical interpretation may count one of the following seminars in place of BIBB9401:
BSBB9401 The Dead Sea Scrolls
BSBB9404 Studies in Greco-Roman Archaeology
BSBB9405 Readings in NW Semitic Literature

Christian Apologetics

APOL9401 Contemporary Issues in Philosophy of Religion (4 hours) Stewart
This seminar is a focused and intensive study of a particular issue(s) of significance in contemporary theology. Attention is given to historical antecedents, as well as logical, theological, ethical, and cultural consequences of the issue or issues studied. Special attention is given to scholars advocating or critiquing the issue or issues considered in the seminar. Accordingly their presuppositions, methodology, and arguments are analyzed and critiqued, giving special attention to biblical and theological concerns. The seminar may be repeated provided the focus of the course is significantly different each time. Also can be taken as PHIL9401.

APOL9406 World Religions (4 hours) Edens, Lemke, Stewart
This study of the world’s living religions treats them individually with attention to historical development and doctrinal content. Emphasis is given to the role of cultural influences in the formation of the religion and in the process of sharing the Christian witness with them. Also can be taken as MISS9406, PHIL9406, or THEO9406.

APOL9413 Historical Jesus (4 hours) Stewart, Ray
The seminar introduces students to theological, biblical, philosophical, and methodological issues related to contemporary Historical Jesus research. Issues addressed include the nature of the task, the role of the historian, tools for the task, and past and contemporary personalities in Historical Jesus research. The seminar will emphasize person reading, research, and writing. Also can be taken as NTGK9413 or THEO9413.

APOL9414 Contemporary Issues in Theology: Atheism and Relativism (4 hours) Stewart
This seminar addresses contemporary expressions of atheism and relativism in the academy and culture, including issues that related to evangelism, biblical studies, apologetics, philosophy, and ethics. Special attention is given to historical and intellectual precursors of atheism and relativism, their contemporary expression, and the methodological presuppositions of those advocating or opposing atheism and relativism. The seminar emphasizes personal reading, research, and writing and will build upon the summer study trip to Wycliffe Hall, Oxford. Students not taking part in the Oxford Study Trip may also take the course for credit with extra work being assigned. Also can be taken as THEO9414.

APOL9415 Theology of Religions (4 hours) Stewart
The seminar constitutes an intensive study of key issues concerning how Christianity relates to other religions, focusing particularly upon the differing conception of God, Jesus, and salvation. Attention is given to pertinent biblical testimony, historical developments, and contemporary perspectives on these issues with a mind to critiquing various perspectives and constructing a suitable Christian response. Also can be taken as THEO9415.

APOL9416 Christology in the Early Church (4 hours) Butler, Stewart
The seminar advances the student’s knowledge of Christology in the early church, particularly as related to historical and theological context. The issues treated in the seminar include the person and work of Christ and the Trinity. Primary attention will be given to selected church fathers, controversies, and church councils. Also can be taken as HIST9416 or THEO9416.

APOL9418 Orthodoxy and Heresy in the Early Church (4 hours) Butler, Riley, Stewart
This seminar examines the development of and relationship between orthodoxy and heresy in the early church. Topics include early heresies, such as Gnosticism, Marcionism, and Montanism; early church fathers and writings; and the responses of the church to heresy. Special attention is also given to contemporary discussions about orthodoxy and heresy with the intention of developing an effective apologetic response to critics of traditional views of Christianity. Also can be taken as HIST9418 or THEO9418.

APDS9400 Directed Study in Christian Apologetics (4 hours) Faculty

APSR9301 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Historical Apologetics (3 hours)

APSR9302 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Apologetic Method (3 hours)

APSR9303 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Philosophical Theology (3 hours)
Also can be taken as THSR9303.

APSR9304 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Contemporary Readings in Christian Apologetics (3 hours)

APQE9100 Qualifying Examination in Christian Apologetics (1 hour)

APRP9100 Research Proposal Approval (1 hour)

APOE9100 Oral Exam in Christian Apologetics (1 hour)

APPA9100 Dissertation Prospectus Approval (1 hour)

APWC9600 Writing Candidate in Christian Apologetics (6 hours)

APDD9100 Dissertation Defense (1 hour)

Christian Education

CEST9300 Educational Research and Statistics (3 hours) Yount
Research (design) and Statistics (analysis) for social services are the advanced languages of Christian ministry research, especially education, evangelism, administration, and leadership. Students will acquire language tools--vocabulary and concepts--for understanding research in one’s field; skills to design one’s own study, collect valid data, and analyze that data to provide answers; and preparation for analyzing empirical research in EdD and PhD seminars, as well as preparation and execution of a formal doctoral research proposal.

CEAD9401 Adult Education (4 hours) Faculty
The purpose of this seminar is to engage students in a comprehensive examination of biblical examples, historical models and contemporary theories of adult education. The application of biblical and pedagogical principles to various learning communities will be explored based on student research interest and focus. Students will make classroom presentations based on individual research and writing. Also can be taken as CECH9401, CEEF9400, or CEYH9400.

CEAD9403 Contemporary Contexts of Adult Ministry (4 hours) Faculty
Students will explore the multifaceted contexts of Christian education, discipleship ministries, and ministry leadership. Emphases will include sociological, educational, technological, and denominational influences on the design and leadership of educational ministry to adults. An effort is made to enhance the student’s understanding of the dominant culture and to equip the student to impact the world more effectively. Also can be taken as CEAL9402, CECH9403, or CEYH9401.

CEAD9404 Adult Discipleship and Spiritual Formation (4 hours) Faculty
The purpose of this seminar is to advance understanding of the fields of discipleship and spiritual formation especially within the context of the local church. This seminar is designed to survey discipleship and spiritual formation of adults by collecting and comparing biblical text and social science research. Special attention is given to definitions and terms, strategies and models, and current discipleship practices pertinent to various life stages. Personal spiritual formation also is addressed. Also can be taken as CECH9404, CEDI9401, or CEYH9404.

CEAD9405 Adult Development and Aging (4 hours) Faculty
In this seminar students will engage in an examination of classic and current theory and research regarding the physical, mental, social, emotional, and spiritual development of adults. Students will acquire a basic understanding of factors that shape the developmental process. Targeted research and individual presentations of selected topics guide student focus in the seminar. Also can be taken as CECH9402, CEEF9403, or CEYH9402.

CEAL9400 Higher Education Leadership (4 hours) Faculty
Leadership principles, philosophies of Christian higher education, and trends in curriculum are investigated through research and lectures. The roles of the principals in the context of higher education are explored. Papers are presented and discussed, and several leadership theories are evaluated.

CEAL9402 Contemporary Contexts of Educational Ministry (4 hours) Odom, Faculty
Students will explore the multifaceted contexts of Christian education, discipleship ministries, and ministry leadership. Emphases will include sociological, educational, technological, and denominational influences on the design and leadership of educational ministry to children, youth, and adults. An effort is made to enhance the student’s understanding of the dominant culture and to equip the student to impact the world more effectively. Also can be taken as CEAD9403, CECH9403, or CEYH9401.

CEAM9401 Strategic Leadership and Organizational Change (4 hours) Faculty
This seminar will involve studying and researching strategic leadership theory and its applications and implications upon churches and ministry organizations. Strategic dimensions of leadership to be examined include strategic thinking, foresight, influence, team-building, and action. The seminar will explore also the leadership disciplines required to initiate and implement successful organizational change. Attention will be given to creating a climate for change, discerning and communication vision, developing strategic planning skills, and analyzing change theory and practice. Also can be taken as PMCL9400.

CEAM9402 Principles of Administration (4 hours) Dean
The purpose of this seminar is to engage students in a comprehensive examination of administrative principles. The direction of the seminar may involve the functional areas of administration; the historical development, philosophy, and contemporary application of the church program organization approach to Christian education; management functions; supervisory methods and tasks; or other fields of study related to administration.

CEAM9403 Building and Managing an Effective Organization (4 hours) Dean, Faculty
This seminar guides students in the understanding, evaluation, and research of management systems utilized in churches, Christian organizations, denominational entities, and Christian higher education institutions. Special attention is given to diagnosing organizational health and guiding productive change. The seminar explores the impact of various forms of church governance on management expressions in churches and the denomination. Also can be taken as PMCL9401.

CEAM9404 Issues in Risk Management (4 hours) Dean
The purpose of this seminar is to provide quality theological education for students in the area of advanced research in the context of risk management in the local church and the Christian institution or organization. Leadership principles, philosophies, hazards, and trends are investigated through research and lectures. Papers are presented and discussed, and several leadership theories are evaluated.

CECH9401 Childhood Education (4 hours) Faculty
The purpose of this seminar is to engage students in a comprehensive examination of biblical examples, historical models, and contemporary theories of childhood education. The application of biblical and pedagogical principles to various learning communities will be explored based on student research interest and focus. Students will make classroom presentations based on individual research and writing. Also can be taken as CEAD9401, CEEF9400, or CEYH9401.

CECH9402 Child Development (4 hours) Faculty
In this seminar students will engage in an examination of classic and current theory and research regarding the physical, mental, social, emotional, and spiritual development of children. Students will acquire a basic understanding of factors that shape the developmental process. Targeted research and individual presentations of selected topics guide student focus in the seminar. Also can be taken as CEAD9405, CEEF9403, or CEYH9402.

CECH9403 Contemporary Contexts of Children’s Ministry (4 hours) Faculty
Students will explore the multifaceted contexts of Christian education, discipleship ministries, and ministry leadership. Emphases will include sociological, educational, technological, and denominational influences on the design and leadership of educational ministry to children. An effort is made to enhance the student’s understanding of the dominant culture and to equip the student to impact the world more effectively. Also can be taken as CEAD9403, CEAL9402, or CEYH9401.

CECH9404 Spiritual Formation of Children (4 hours) Faculty
The purpose of this seminar is to advance understanding of the fields of discipleship and spiritual formation especially within the context of the local church. This seminar is designed to survey discipleship and spiritual formation of children by collecting and comparing biblical text and social science research. Special attention is given to definitions and terms, strategies and models, and current discipleship practices pertinent to various life stages. Personal spiritual formation also is addressed. Also can be taken as CEAD9404, CEDI9401, or CEYH9404.

CEDI9401 Discipleship and Spiritual Formation (4 hours) Stone, Faculty
The purpose of this seminar is to advance understanding of the fields of discipleship and spiritual formation especially within the context of the local church. This seminar is designed to survey discipleship and spiritual formation across the lifespan by collecting and comparing biblical text and social science research. Special attention is given to definitions and terms, strategies and models, as well as current discipleship practices pertinent to various life stages. Personal spiritual formation is also addressed. Also can be taken as CEAD9404, CECH9404, or CEYH9404.

CEDI9402 Family Ministry in Church Life (4 hours) Faculty
This seminar is designed to survey contemporary family discipleship ministry and developmental concerns involving preschoolers, children, youth and parents. Needs that can be addressed through family ministry and discipleship endeavors in local Baptist churches are identified and researched. Special attention is given to introduction to current literature in the field. Family discipleship projects are developed and evaluated.

CEEF9400 Lifespan Education (4 hours) Odom, Faculty
The purpose of this seminar is to engage students in a comprehensive examination of biblical examples, historical models, and contemporary theories of education. The application of biblical and pedagogical principles to various learning communities will be explored based on student research interest and focus. Students will make classroom presentations based on individual research and writing. Also can be taken as CEAD9401, CECH9401, or CEYH9400.

CEEF9401 History and Philosophy of Christian Education (4 hours) Faculty
The purpose of this seminar is to advance understanding of the fields of discipleship and spiritual formation especially within the context of the local church. This seminar is designed to survey discipleship and spiritual formation across the lifespan by collecting and comparing biblical text and social science research. Special attention is given to definitions and terms, strategies and models, and current discipleship practices pertinent to various life stages. Personal spiritual formation also is addressed. Also can be taken as CEAD9404, CECH9404, or CEYH9404.

CEEF9402 Educational Psychology (4 hours) Yount, Faculty
The purpose of this seminar is to engage students in a comprehensive examination of educational psychology. Special attention is devoted to concepts which describe principles of teaching, theories of learning, motivational psychology, and instructional objectives. The study provides for an analysis of representative expressions of the teaching-learning transaction as they focus on the ministry of Christian education.

CEEF9403 Human Growth and Development (4 hours) Peavey, Faculty
In this seminar students will engage in an examination of classic and current theory and research regarding the physical, mental, social, emotional, and spiritual development of children, adolescents, and adults from conception through senior adulthood. Students will acquire a basic understanding of factors that shape the developmental process. Targeted research and individual presentations of selected topics guide student focus in the seminar. Also can be taken as CEAD9405, CECH9402, or CEYH9402.

CEEF9405 Advanced Pedagogy (4 hours) Peavey, Faculty
Students will compare and evaluate contemporary instructional strategies and forms of assessment to be used in higher education. Instructional strategies to be examined include the flipped classroom, problem-based learning, and teaching online. Forms of assessment to be examined include rubrics, tests and measurements, portfolios, and informal and formal assessments. At the end of this course students will apply appropriate contemporary instructional strategies and forms of assessment to topics of study in an existing syllabus. RDOC9302 is a prerequisite for this course.

CEYH9400 Youth Education (4 hours) Faculty
The purpose of this seminar is to engage students in a comprehensive examination of biblical examples, historical models, and contemporary theories of youth education. The application of biblical and pedagogical principles to various learning communities will be explored based on student research interest and focus. Students will make classroom presentations based on individual research and writing. Also can be taken as CEAD9401, CECH9401, or CEEF9400.

CEYH9401 Youth Ministry in Cultural Contexts (4 hours) Faculty
Students will explore the multifaceted contexts of Christian education, discipleship ministries, and ministry leadership. Emphases will include sociological, educational, technological, and denominational influences on the design and leadership of educational ministry to youth. An effort is made to enhance the student’s understanding of the dominant culture and to equip the student to impact the world more effectively. Also can be taken as CEAD9403, CEAL9402, or CECH9403.

CEYH9402 Adolescent Development (4 hours) Faculty
In this seminar students will engage in an examination of classic and current theory and research regarding the physical, mental, social, emotional, and spiritual development of adolescents. Students will acquire a basic understanding of factors that shape the developmental process. Targeted research and individual presentations of selected topics guide student focus in the seminar. Also can be taken as CEAD9405, CECH9402, or CEEF9403.

CEYH9404 Discipling Adolescents and Emerging Adults (4 hours) Faculty
The purpose of this seminar is to advance understanding of the fields of discipleship and spiritual formation especially within the context of the local church. This seminar is designed to survey discipleship and spiritual formation of adolescents and emerging adults by collecting and comparing biblical text and social science research. Special attention is given to definitions and terms, strategies and models, and current discipleship practices pertinent to various life stages. Personal spiritual formation also is addressed. Also can be taken as CEAD9404, CECH9404, or CEDI9401.

CEDS9400 Directed Study in Christian Education (4 hours)

Faculty CESR9301 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Adult and Family (3 hours)

CESR9302 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Foundations in Christian Education (3 hours)

CESR9303 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Children and Youth (3 hours)

CESR93XX Supervised Reading Colloquium: Specialized Study in Focus Area (3 hours)

9311 Childhood Education

9315 Educational Foundations

9312 Youth Education

9319 Family Ministry

9313 Adult Education

9320 Discipleship and Spiritual Formation

9314 Leadership and Administration

CEQE9100 Qualifying Examination in Christian Education (1 hour)

CERP9100 Research Proposal Approval (1 hour)

CEOE9100 Oral Exam in Christian Education (1 hour)

CEPA9100 Dissertation Prospectus Approval (1 hour)

CEWC9600 Writing Candidate in Christian Education (6 hours)

CEDD9100 Dissertation Defense (1 hour)

Christian Leadership

CEAL9400 Higher Education Leadership (4 hours) Faculty
Leadership principles, philosophies of Christian higher education, and trends in curriculum are investigated through research and lectures. The roles of the principals in the context of higher education are explored. Papers are presented and discussed, and several leadership theories are evaluated.

CEAL9402 Contemporary Context of Christian Education (4 hours) Faculty
Students will explore the multi-faceted contexts of Christian education, discipleship ministries, and ministry leadership. Emphases will include sociological, educational, technological and denominational influences on the design and leadership of educational ministry to children, youth and adults. An effort is made to enhance the student’s understanding of the dominant culture and to equip the student to impact the world more effectively. Also can be taken as CEAD9403, CECH9403, or CEYH9401.

CEAM9401 Strategic Leadership and Organizational Change (4 hours) Dean, Ogea, Stone
This seminar will involve studying and researching strategic leadership theory and its applications and implications upon churches and ministry organizations. Strategic dimensions of leadership to be examined include strategic thinking, foresight, influence, team-building, and action. The seminar will explore also the leadership disciplines required to initiate and implement successful organizational change. Attention will be given to creating a climate for change, discerning and communication vision, developing strategic planning skills, and analyzing change theory and practice. Also can be taken as PMCL9400.

CEAM9402 Principles of Administration (4 hours) Dean
The purpose of this seminar is to engage students in a comprehensive examination of administrative principles. The direction of the seminar may involve the functional areas of administration; the historical development, philosophy, and contemporary application of the church program organization approach to Christian education; management functions; supervisory methods and tasks; or other fields of study related to administration.

CEAM9403 Building and Managing an Effective Organization (4 hours) Dean, Ogea, Stone
This seminar guides students in the understanding, evaluation, and research of management systems utilized in churches, Christian organizations, denominational entities, and Christian higher education institutions. Special attention is given to diagnosing organizational health and guiding productive change. The seminar explores the impact of various forms of church governance on management expressions in churches and the denomination. Also can be taken as PMCL9401.

PMCL9400 Strategic Leadership and Organizational Change (4 hours) Dean, Ogea, Stone
This seminar will involve studying and researching strategic leadership theory and its applications and implications upon churches and ministry organizations. Strategic dimensions of leadership to be examined include strategic thinking, foresight, influence, team-building, and action. The seminar will explore also the leadership disciplines required to initiate and implement successful organizational change. Attention will be given to creating a climate for change, discerning and communication vision, developing strategic planning skills, and analyzing change theory and practice. Also can be taken as CEAM9401.

PMCL9401 Building and Managing an Effective Organization (4 hours) Dean, Ogea, Stone
This seminar guides students in the understanding, evaluation, and research of management systems utilized in churches, Christian organizations, denominational entities, and Christian higher education institutions. Special attention is given to diagnosing organizational health and guiding productive change. The seminar explores the impact of various forms of church governance on management expressions in churches and the denomination. Also can be taken as CEAM9403.

PMCL9402 Pastoral Leadership (4 hours) Ogea
This seminar examines current and classic leadership theory from a pastoral viewpoint. Students will utilize leadership theory research to analyze specific pastoral leadership styles in both historic and contemporary examples. The seminar will include the evaluation of various pastoral leadership models from a biblical perspective. Also can be taken as BEXP9413.

PMCL9403 Studies in Classical and Contemporary Pastoral Theology (4 hours) Ogea
This seminar studies the work of significant pastors, past and present, in regard to their times, ministry, person, and contributions to the field of pastoral theology. The study also will include an investigation of important issues and problems faced by these pastors, in order to identify evident trends, practical principles, and helpful resources which can shape effective pastoral ministry. Also can be taken as BEXP9412.

PMCL9404 Church Revitalization and Strategic Leadership (4 hours) Roudkovski
This seminar will seek to identify the factors common to leaders and their churches which have experienced growth from a plateaued or declining position. The factors associated with church health and revitalization will be compared and contrasted with characteristics of churches experiencing plateau and decline. Implications will be drawn for strategic planning, the SBC, and the personal development of the church’s leaders. Also can be taken as EVAN9407.

PMCL9405 Strategic Proclamation (4 hours) Ogea
This seminar will involve researching the application of organizational leadership theory through strategic proclamation in both historic and contemporary church and denominational contexts. Students will examine planned proclamation by significant expositors in a variety of church and denominational contexts, such as church revitalization, church planting, church relocation, congregational and denominational crises, or other strategic situations. Also can be taken as BEXP9416.

PMCL9406 Conflict Resolution and Crisis Management (4 hours) Ogea
This seminar will involve studying and researching the issues and implications of conflict resolution and crisis management in congregations and ministry organizations. Students will explore intensity levels of conflict, theories of conflict resolution and crisis management, and appropriate leadership skills related to conflict resolution and crisis management in congregations and ministry organizations.

PMCL9407 Biblical and Theological Basis for Christian Leadership (4 hours) Ogea
This seminar will involve studying and examining the biblical leadership principles and styles of leadership in the Old Testament and New Testament.

Students will determine the theological implications and leadership principles foundational for effective Christian leadership.

CLDS9400 Directed Study in Christian Leadership (4 hours)

CLSR9301 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Historical Leadership Developments (3 hours)

CLSR9302 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Contemporary Contextual Issues in Christian Leadership (3 hours)

CLSR9303 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Leadership Theory and Practice (3 hours)

CLSR9304 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Specialized Study in Focus Area (3 hours)

CLQE9100 Qualifying Examination in Christian Leadership (1 hour)

CLRP9100 Research Proposal Approval (1 hour) CLOE9100 Oral Exam in Christian Leadership (1 hour)

CLPA9100 Dissertation Prospectus Approval (1 hour)

CLWC9600 Writing Candidate in Christian Leadership (6 hours)

CLDD9100 Dissertation Defense (1 hour)

Church History

HIST9401 Studies in Early Christianity (4 hours) Holcomb
This seminar involves a critical examination of the Christian movement during the first six centuries of its development. Attention is given to the political, social, philosophical, and religious milieu of the Greco-Roman world and to the institutional, theological, and literary development of Christianity in this environment. Also can be taken as NTGK9404.

HIST9402 Theory and Method of Church History (4 hours) Holcomb
This seminar addresses theoretical issues and fundamental procedures of the historian’s craft with attention to contemporary alternatives as well as established principles and methods. Student presentations draw upon the writings of major contributors to the discussion of theory and method. Particular emphasis is given to historians who effectively model their programmatic views in substantive historical works. The seminar is designed to help students become proficient researchers, interpreters, and communicators of church history.

HIST9403 The Continental Reformation (4 hours) Holcomb
This seminar investigates significant features of the Protestant Reformation as it progressed on the continent of Europe to the Treaty of Westphalia (1648). Research assignments address significant leaders, documents, and ideas of this period, including Lutheran, Reformed, and Radical phases.

HIST9404 The Reformation and Puritanism in England (4 hours) Harsch, Holcomb
This seminar involves a study of the Protestant Reformation as it developed in England. Special attention will be given to the theological and political contexts from which Anglicanism, Puritanism, and Separatism emerged. An introductory examination of the influence of Wycliff, Lollardism, humanism, and nationalism is followed by research problems in such areas as the progress of reform under the Tudors and the Stuarts; the rise of Puritanism and Nonconformity; the Civil Wars, the Interregnum, and the Restoration in 1660.

HIST9405 Theology of the Major Reformers (4 hours) Holcomb, Butler, Edens, Harwood, Stewart
Beginning with an overview of late medieval theology, especially of those flashpoints that elicited increasing debate and dissent, the seminar addresses significant features of Reformation thought on the European continent during the 16th century. Also can be taken as THEO9405.

HIST9406 Religion in Colonial America (4 hours) Harsch
This seminar addresses the formation and development of a variety of theological and ecclesiastical expressions of Christianity in Colonial America, with a particular focus on the Puritans. This seminar gives particular attention to the relationship between Church and State, the struggle for religious liberty, the influence of the First Great Awakening, and the formation of national denominational organizations.

HIST9407 Christianity in the United States (4 hours) Harsch
This study involves an investigation into the beliefs, practices, and organizational structure of the various denominational families in the United States. Emphasis is placed on the historical development of each family and on the current state of each denomination. The seminar includes interaction with representatives from a variety of denominational traditions and examines the opportunities and challenges presented by the American environment since the founding of the nation.

HIST9408 Baptist Origins in England and America (4 hours) Harsch
This seminar examines the major theories of Baptist origins in England and America in the 17th century. Prominent personalities, distinctive doctrines, and foundational practices are examined and interpreted in light of their historical setting. Baptist distinctives are explored, with special emphasis given to comparing Baptist theology and practice with early Anabaptists, especially Balthasar Hubmaier, and Reformed leaders. Primary sources, drawing heavily on the rare pamphlet collection in the John T. Christian Library, will be consulted.

HIST9409 Baptist Life and Faith (4 hours) Harsch
Participants study selected personalities, principles, practices, problems, and movements that have influenced Baptist life and faith significantly since the 18th century. Notable Baptist contributions are indicated. Particular attention will be given to how differences in theology, ecclesiology, and practice have impacted Baptist life.

HIST9410 Keepers of the Springs: The Devotional Classics and the Heritage of Christian Spirituality (4 hours) Holcomb, Riley
This seminar is a theological and historical examination of Christian spirituality through the lens of the classics of Christian devotion. Attention is given to the dynamics of the Christian life and the disciplines that nurture it. The seminar explores the relationship of the classics to current discussions on the method and content of spiritual theology. Also can be taken as THEO9419.

HIST9411 Baptist Theologians (4 hours) Harsch, Harwood
In this seminar students are required to read the major systematic theologies written by Baptists in America in the 19th and 20th centuries. Also can be taken as THEO9411.

HIST9416 Christology in the Early Church (4 hours) Butler, Stewart
The seminar advances the student’s knowledge of Christology in the early church, particularly as related to historical and theological context. The issues treated in the seminar include the person and work of Christ and the Trinity. Primary attention will be given to selected church fathers, controversies, and church councils. Also can be taken as APOL9416 or THEO9416.

HIST9418 Orthodoxy and Heresy in the Early Church (4 hours) Butler, Riley, Stewart
This seminar examines the development of and relationship between orthodoxy and heresy in the early church. Topics include early heresies, such as Gnosticism, Marcionism, and Montanism; early church fathers and writings; and the responses of the church to heresy. Special attention is also given to contemporary discussions about orthodoxy and heresy with the intention of developing an effective apologetic response to critics of traditional views of Christianity. Also can be taken as APOL9418 or THEO9418.

HIDS9400 Directed Study in Church History (4 hours) Faculty

HISR9301 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Early and Medieval Christianity (3 hours)

HISR9302 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Historical Theology (3 hours)

HISR9303 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Reformation and Modern Christianity (3 hours)

HISR9304 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Baptist History and Theology (3 hours)

HIQE9100 Qualifying Examination in Church History (1 hour)

HIRP9100 Research Proposal Approval (1 hour) HIOE9100 Oral Exam in Church History (1 hour)

HIPA9100 Dissertation Prospectus Approval (1 hour)

HIWC9600 Writing Candidate in Church History (6 hours)

HIDD9100 Dissertation Defense (1 hour)

Counselor Education and Supervision

COUN9301 Counseling Approaches to Social Problems and Advocacy (3 hours) Faculty
Counseling principles and techniques are applied to the process of understanding and alleviating social problems. Institutions and agencies working specifically in the areas of study are surveyed. Students will conduct substantial research to delineate counseling processes of change to social problems.

COUN9302 Biblical and Theological Foundations of Counseling (3 hours) Faculty
Recognizing the need for personal integration of Christian theology and the Bible into the counselor’s own life, this course is designed to examine and express the connections between humans and God as defined in Scripture. Models of integrating Scripture and counseling are presented. Students are challenged to learn effective, therapeutic methods of sharing biblical passages, principles, theology, and historical contexts with counselees. God’s Word is presented as the truth which permeates the presence of the Christian counseling environment.

COUN9308 Contemporary Approaches in Counseling (3 hours) Faculty
This seminar is an intensive examination of the contemporary approaches to therapy. Students must demonstrate conceptual and execution skills in several models of therapy.

COUN9312 Counseling in the Church (3 hours) Faculty
This seminar will examine the ministry of counseling in the church. Areas of study will include the biblical, theological, and historical foundations for counseling ministry; existing models of church counseling; preparation and development of counseling ministries; lay counseling; and ethical issues related to counseling ministries.

COUN9313 Counseling Supervision Theory and Practice (3 hours) Faculty
This course in counselor supervision covers the basic concepts and models of supervision in counseling; the supervisory relationship; supervision methods and techniques; administrative issues; and ethical, legal, and theological issues in supervision. Students will develop knowledge and skills in supervision through readings, research, seminar discussions, and evaluation of their supervision of counselors-in-training.

COUN9314 Neuropsychology and Psychopharmacology (3 hours) Faculty
In this course students will examine the theory and practice of neuropsychology and psychopharmacology. Neuropsychology seeks to assess and interpret the relationship between nervous system function, cognition, emotion, and behavior and to apply this knowledge to the design of individualized client interventions. Students will be challenged to explore how neuropsychology and biblical concepts intercept.

COUN9360 Program Evaluation and Research Design (3 hours) Faculty
This course will provide to doctoral level students experience in conducting various research methods and program evaluation, with a primary focus on program evaluation. Additionally, specific attention is given to methods of research, qualitative and quantitative, experimental control, validity, behavioral assessment, instrumentation and measurement techniques, sampling methods, hypothesis development, descriptive and inferential statistics, the writing of research proposals and report development.

COUN9362 Advanced Quantitative Statistics (3 hours) Faculty
This course will provide to doctoral level students experience in conducting advanced quantitative research methods and discovering how they aid in the promotion of efficient and effective evidenced-based practices with clients, counselors, students, and supervisees. Specific attention is given to various methods of regression analysis, factor analysis, and structural equation modeling, including the utilization of a statistical software for each method of analysis.

COUN9365 Advanced Qualitative Methods (3 hours) Faculty
This course examines the theoretical and conceptual frameworks for qualitative research methods, including training to do a qualitative data analysis, participant observation, organizational observation, structured and non-structured interviewing, discourse analysis, and interpretation and presentation of original research.

COUN9375 Research Design and Program Evaluation (3 hours) Faculty
This course will provide to doctoral level students experience in conducting various research methods and program evaluation. The course covers an investigation of regression analysis and other forms of multivariate analyses. Additionally, specific attention is given to methods of research, experimental control, validity, behavioral assessment, instrumentation and measurement techniques, sampling methods, hypothesis development, descriptive and inferential statistics, the writing of research proposals and report development. The students will learn how to apply and solve statistical questions using various data sets as well as how to input data sets into SPSS.

COUN9380 Doctoral Practicum (3 hours) Faculty
This practicum course provides supervised experiences in counseling. Students must participate in a supervised practicum of a minimum of 100 hours, of which 40 hours must be providing direct counseling services. The nature of the doctoral-level practicum experience is to be determined in consultation with the counselor education program faculty. Individual or triadic supervision meetings with a faculty supervisor or a qualified supervisor, as well as regular group supervision meetings with a faculty supervisor are required.

COUN9390 Doctoral Internship 1 (3 hours) Faculty
COUN9391 Doctoral Internship 2 (3 hours) Faculty
These internships provide supervised experiences in teaching, supervision, leadership and advocacy, counseling, and research and scholarship. Each student develops the internship program according to the areas identified by the student and advisor that are necessary for comprehensive preparation as a counselor educator and supervisor and that are relevant to the specific career goals of each student. Each Doctoral Internship requires a total of 300 hours of work experience in the professional areas selected by the student, and 120 hours of the 300 hours must constitute direct service to clients, students, supervisees, or professionals. Individual or triadic supervision meetings with a faculty supervisor or a qualified supervisor, as well as regular group supervision meetings with a faculty supervisor are required. The internship offers psychosocial support, role modeling, and professional development in counselor education and supervision.

CODS9300 Directed Study in Counselor Education and Supervision (3 hours) Faculty

COSR9301 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Issues in Counseling (3 hours)

COSR9302 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Physiological/Psychological Issues in Counseling (3 hours)

COSR9305 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Addiction in Counseling (3 hours)

COSR9306 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Leadership and Advocacy (3 hours)

COSR9307 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Spirituality in Counseling (3 hours)

COQE9100 Qualifying Examination in Counselor Education and Supervision (1 hour)

CORP9100 Research Proposal Approval (1 hour)

COOE9100 Oral Exam in Counselor Education and Supervision (1 hour)

COPA9100 Dissertation Prospectus Approval (1 hour)

COWC9600 Writing Candidate in Counselor Education and Supervision (6 hours)

CODD9100 Dissertation Defense (1 hour)

Ethics

ETHC9401 Biblical Ethics (4 hours) Lemke, Riley
This seminar surveys the ethical teachings of the Scriptures in the context of their historical and cultural setting. The study will focus on theologians, ethicists, and biblical scholars who have made major contributions in the areas of biblical ethics, biblical interpretation, Old Testament ethics, New Testament ethics, the ethics of Jesus, and the ethics of Paul, as well as developing a methodology for the interpretation of ethical passages in the Scriptures. Also serves as a theology seminar.

ETHC9402 Contemporary Christian Ethics (4 hours) Riley
The seminar surveys recent trends in Christian ethics by studying major contemporary theological movements and evaluating the key theologians/ ethicists who have made significant contributions to Christian ethics. Students will analyze the biblical, theological, and historical bases for moral character development and ethical decision making in these contemporary resources to develop an adequate ethical methodology. Also serves as a theology seminar.

ETHC9403 Current Ethical Issues (4 hours) Riley
The seminar surveys current moral issues addressed in Christian ethics, critically examining a variety of topics and questions regarding individual conduct, character, and the church, as well as how cultural, social, and political mores influence the way Christians live in and respond to the world. Students will analyze and develop biblical, theological, and philosophical positions on current moral issues. Possible topics include issues on life and death, medical ethics, wealth and poverty, human sexuality, marriage and divorce, and so forth.

ETHC9404 History of Christian Ethical Thought (4 hours) Riley
The seminar surveys major Christian and non-Christian figures and movements that have shaped moral theology and Christian ethics from the First Century church to the early Twentieth Century. Emphasis is placed on the moral positions and ethical methodologies of Catholic and Protestant theologians and ethicists. Histories of Christian Ethics are utilized. Primary sources are highlighted. Also serves as a theology seminar.

ETHC9490 Contemporary Issues in Public Policy (4 hours) Riley
The seminar is offered in partnership with the ERLC and is an examination of selected issues in contemporary public theology. It will analyze the biblical, doctrinal, historical, and practical aspects of applying Christian theology and ethics in the public square. The seminar may be repeated provided the focus of the course is significantly different each time.

ETDS9400 Directed Study in Ethics (4 hours) Faculty

Evangelism

EVAN9401 Emerging Issues in Evangelism and Church Growth (4 hours) Roudkovski, Nix
This seminar is a study of the most current positive issues and potentially dangerous issues that are emerging in evangelism and church growth. In addition to researching the latest printed resources to discover and discuss issues, students will gain new information through the construction and implementation of surveys and other data-gaining devices.

EVAN9402 History of Revivals and Awakenings (4 hours) Nix
A study is made of the origin and growth of revivalism and its impact upon evangelism and church expansion in the 20th century. The European and American contexts will be the primary focus. Attention also is given to past and present evangelistic preaching and to the evangelistic history of the Southern Baptist Convention.

EVAN9403 Church Growth Foundations and Development (4 hours) Nix
This seminar is a study of the church growth movement in America from the middle part of the 20th century to the present.

EVAN9404 The Biblical and Theological Basis of Evangelism and Discipleship (4 hours) Roudkovski, Nix
This seminar will examine the biblical and theological basis and approaches to evangelism and disciple making. The early church will be examined as to why and how it engaged in spreading the life-changing message of Christ as well.

EVAN9407 Church Revitalization and Strategic Leadership (4 hours) Roudkovski
This seminar will seek to identify the factors common to leaders and their churches which have experienced growth from a plateaued or declining position. The factors associated with church health and revitalization will be compared and contrasted with characteristics of churches experiencing plateau and decline. Implications will be drawn for strategic planning, the SBC, and the personal development of the church’s leaders. Also can be taken as PMCL9404.

EVAN9408 First- and Twenty-First Century Ministry and Missions Parallels (4 hours) Roudkovski, Rice
This seminar examines the striking parallels between the context for missions and ministry in the early church and missions and ministry in the church of the 21st century. Context and corresponding methods will be examined in the areas of evangelism and church planting along with disciple making and global missionary principles. The book of Acts and the early church will be examined, along with the local and global evangelism and missions tasks and context facing the 21st-century church. Also can be taken as MISS9408.

EVDS9400 Directed Study in Evangelism (4 hours) Faculty

EVSR9301 Supervised Reading Colloquium: History and Theology of Evangelism (3 hours)

EVSR9302 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Church Growth (3 hours)

EVSR9303 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Missions (3 hours)

EVSR9304 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Contemporary Methods and Models of Evangelism (3 hours)

EVQE9100 Qualifying Examination in Evangelism (1 hour)

EVRP9100 Research Proposal Approval (1 hour)

EVOE9100 Oral Exam in Evangelism (1 hour)

EVPA9100 Dissertation Prospectus Approval (1 hour)

EVWC9600 Writing Candidate in Evangelism (6 hours)

EVDD9100 Dissertation Defense (1 hour)

Students majoring in evangelism may count the following seminar toward the five required seminars in the major:

BEXP9409 A Survey of Evangelistic Preaching

Missions

MISS9401 Cross-Cultural Communication (4 hours) Pinckard
This seminar examines the dynamics of cross-cultural communication, integrating biblical, sociological, anthropological, and psychological perspectives. Particular attention is given to issues of worldview and to contextualization of evangelism, discipleship, spirituality, hermeneutics, preaching, and other disciplines of the Christian faith.

MISS9402 Urban Missions (4 hours) Taylor
This seminar examines the future of urban missions in light of its biblical and theological foundations, history, and contemporary implementation. Trends of global urbanization are examined with an emphasis on their impact on missions.

MISS9403 Missions Theology and Principles (4 hours) Pinckard
The theology and principles of missions are examined from the perspectives of biblical foundations, historical development, contemporary discussions, and future directions. Special attention is given to major missiological motifs, the impact of significant missiological movements, and the interaction between theology and missiological principles.

MISS9404 A History of Christian Missions (4 hours) Taylor
This seminar is designed to survey the expansion of Christianity from its small Jewish beginnings to its present position as a unique universal faith. Emphasis is placed on major periods and outstanding personalities from Pentecost to the present. Additionally, distinctive patterns of development, or influences, are noted that radically changed Christianity from a local religious movement of the Near East into the dominant religion of Europe and increasingly freed it from limitations of geographic and cultural restraints so that it could spread into all areas of the world. Also serves as a church history seminar.

MISS9406 World Religions (4 hours) Edens, Lemke, Stewart
This study of the world’s living religions treats them individually with attention to historical development and doctrinal content. Emphasis is given to the role of cultural influences in the formation of the religion and in the process of sharing the Christian witness with them. Also can be taken as APOL9406, PHIL9406, or THEO9406.

MISS9408 First- and Twenty-First Century Ministry and Missions Parallels (4 hours) Rice, Roudkovski
This seminar examines the striking parallels between the context for missions and ministry in the early church and missions and ministry in the church of the 21st century. Context and corresponding methods will be examined in the areas of evangelism and church planting along with disciple making and global missionary principles. The book of Acts and the early church will be examined, along with the local and global evangelism and missions tasks and context facing the 21st-century church. Also can be taken as EVAN9408.

MIDS9400 Directed Study in Missions (4 hours) Faculty

New Testament

Note: Twelve hours of Greek are prerequisite for advanced study in the New Testament.

NTGK9401 New Testament Textual Criticism (4 hours) Warren
This seminar builds upon the course in textual criticism taught at the master’s level by way of first-hand work in the Greek manuscripts, attention to recent works in the field of textual criticism, and the use and analysis of dominant methodologies in the field. Early versions of the New Testament, church father citations, and factors affecting transmission of the New Testament text also are considered.

NTGK9403 New Testament Theology (4 hours) Ray, Stewart
Study is made of selected theological emphases in the Greek New Testament. The Hebrew Old Testament, the Septuagint, and nonbiblical writings offering light on New Testament usage, as well as current literature, are studied. Also can be taken as THEO9407.

NTGK9404 The Canon of the New Testament (4 hours) Warren
This seminar includes such subjects as the motives which retarded the development of the canon and those which led to the development of the canon; the collection, use, and canonization of the various sections of the New Testament; the use of books outside the canon by Christians; and the churches, people, and documents which bear witness to the development of the canon. Also can be taken as HIST9401.

NTGK9405 New Testament Manuscript Studies and Analyses (4 hours) Warren
This seminar builds upon a working knowledge of New Testament textual criticism and manuscript collation procedures. The emphasis in the seminar is on the study and analysis of the Greek minuscule manuscripts of the New Testament. Data is compiled by adding collations of manuscripts or portions of manuscripts to the database at the Center for New Testament Textual Studies and then analyzing the results utilizing such methods as the quantitative analysis method and the Claremont profile method. A prerequisite for entrance into the seminar is the course NTGK6390 Textual Criticism of the Greek New Testament or its equivalent.

NTGK9410 The Social Setting of the New Testament (4 hours) Warren
This seminar involves the student in an extensive study of various social, political, religious, and economic backgrounds that can aid in understanding the message of the New Testament. An introduction to the study of social settings and the social-science methodology is followed by an analysis of the various social backgrounds based upon extensive study of the historical documents from the New Testament time period.

NTGK9413 Historical Jesus (4 hours) Ray, Stewart
The seminar introduces students to theological, biblical, philosophical, and methodological issues related to contemporary Historical Jesus research. Issues addressed include the nature of the task, the role of the historian, tools for the task, and past and contemporary personalities in Historical Jesus research. The seminar will emphasize personal reading, research, and writing. Also can be taken as APOL9413 or THEO9413.

NTGK9416 New Testament Chronology (4 hours) Dukes
The seminar consist of an intensive study of the data dealing with the chronology of the New Testament. The design is such as to elicit maximum participation on the part of the students.

NTGK9420 Biblical Intertextuality (4 hours) Ray, England
This seminar is a directed doctoral-level research seminar investigating textual relationships between the Old and New Testaments. Specifically, the seminar focuses on the New Testament authors’ use of quotations, allusions, and echoes from the Old Testament. Also can be taken as OTHB9420.

NTGK94XX New Testament Exegesis (4 hours) Price, Ray, Stevens, Warren
The seminars are designed for intensive exegetical work in selected portions of the New Testament. Attention is given to such introductory matters as date, authorship, occasion, and purpose. Exegesis of the Greek text is made with the help of the best critical literature available.

9432 Mark

 9437 1 Corinthians

9434 John

 9446 Hebrews

9435 Acts (also serves as a missions seminar)

 9448 1-2 Peter, Jude

9436 Romans 

9450 Revelation

NTDS9400 Directed Study in New Testament (4 hours) Faculty

NTSR9301 Supervised Reading Colloquium: New Testament Overview and Backgrounds (3 hours)

NTSR9302 Supervised Reading Colloquium: New Testament Theology, Linguistics, and Johannine Studies (3 hours)

NTSR9303 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Synoptic Gospels, Historical Jesus, and Text and Canon (3 hours)

NTSR9304 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Introduction and Pauline Studies (3 hours)

NTQE9100 Qualifying Examination in New Testament (1 hour)

NTRP9100 Research Proposal Approval (1 hour)

NTOE9100 Oral Exam in New Testament (1 hour)

NTPA9100 Dissertation Prospectus Approval (1 hour)

NTWC9600 Writing Candidate in New Testament (6 hours)

NTDD9100 Dissertation Defense (1 hour)

Students majoring in New Testament may count one of the following seminars toward the five required seminars in the major:
BSBB9401 The Dead Sea Scrolls
BSBB9404 Studies in Greco-Roman Archaeology
BSBB9405 Readings in NW Semitic Literature

Old Testament

Note: Twelve hours of Hebrew are prerequisite for advanced study in the Old Testament.

OTHB9401 Religion in the Former Prophets (4 hours) Mosley
This seminar is designed as an intensive exegetical study of selected texts in Joshua, Judges, Samuel, and Kings. Attention is given to the ancient Near Eastern religious environments and the practices of ancient Israel, including the areas of cultic leadership, practices, symbols, and worship centers.

OTHB9402 Wisdom Literature (4 hours) Faculty
This seminar explores the literature and theology of the sages in the Old Testament and Apocrypha. Emphasis is given to the field of wisdom studies, the ancient Near Eastern context of wisdom, and particular themes and texts in the wisdom literature.

OTHB9403 The Workings of Hebrew Poetry (4 hours) Cole
This seminar explores the major theories about the nature of Hebrew poetry, with the aim of identifying the driving mechanism(s) behind this rich literary form. It also deals in depth with several selected poetic texts, with the aim of applying the principles learned to the interpretation of such texts. As such, the seminar has both a theoretical and a practical component, and a goal of full and proper exegesis of poetic texts is constantly kept in view.

OTHB9404 Historiography: The Theology of Writing History (4 hours) Cole
“History” comes in many guises. The term refers to bare facts or events, as well as to various forms of the record of such facts or events. “Historiography” (or “history writing”) generally refers to the latter: the record of events. This course covers (1) general historiography and philosophies of history, (2) ancient Near Eastern historiography, and (3) biblical (OT) historiography. It addresses such questions as an author’s view or philosophy of history, his purpose in writing, and how well he executes that purpose via his use of sources, selectivity, point of view, and literary artistry.

OTHB9405 Theology of the Old Testament (4 hours) England
This seminar explores the various issues in the field of Old Testament theology. Emphasis is given to historical development and methodology in Old Testament theology as well as treatment of various theological emphases in the Old Testament. Also can serve as a theology seminar.

OTHB9406 The Pentateuch as Narrative (4 hours) Faculty
This seminar is a study of the Pentateuch as a whole, involving comparison and contrast of various methodological approaches, but with particular emphasis on its narrative quality. Consideration of the history of the critical analysis of the material will set the stage for the study.

OTHB9407 Old Testament Criticism (4 hours) England
This seminar explores the various critical methods (classical and current) used in the study of the Old Testament. Emphasis is given to an application of the critical methods to texts in the Old Testament.

OTHB9410 Studies in Biblical Law (4 hours) Faculty
The focus of the study is biblical law, particularly on the Pentateuch and the recognized law codes within it. The foundation for the study will be the consideration of the significant literature on the subject and an exposure to and evaluation of the basic issues related to biblical law. This will include a study of the nature of law in general, its social context in the ancient Near East, the role of Moses as lawgiver, the origin and development of individual laws, and the significance of Old Testament law for modern Christians. The core of the study will be intensive textual work, consisting of textual criticism, grammatical and syntactical analysis, and thorough exegetical work employing both traditional historical and modern literary methodologies. Exposition of the text will lead to an application of the principles to modern living from a Christian perspective.

OTHB9420 Biblical Intertextuality (4 hours) Ray, England
The seminar entitled Biblical Intertextuality is a directed doctoral-level research seminar investigating textual relationships between the Old and New Testaments. Specifically, the seminar focuses on the New Testament authors’ use of quotations, allusions, and echoes from the Old Testament. Also can be taken as NTGK9420.

OTHB94XX Old Testament Exegesis (4 hours) Cole, England, Mosley
These seminars are designed for intensive exegetical work in selected texts within the Old Testament, delineated by themes, genres, or biblical books. Attention will be given to issues such as background, history of interpretation, language, and theology of the selected texts.

9431 Genesis 

9449 Isaiah

9444 Job 

9450 Jeremiah

9445 Psalms

9451 Amos/Hosea

9447 Ecclesiastes

OTDS9400 Directed Study in Old Testament (4 hours) Faculty

OTSR9301 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Old Testament Overview and Backgrounds (3 hours)
OTSR9302 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Biblical Archaeology and History (3 hours)

OTSR9303 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Old Testament Prophecy and Wisdom/Poetry (3 hours)
OTSR9304 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Old Testament Theology and Methodologies (3 hours)
OTQE9100 Qualifying Examination in Old Testament (1 hour)

OTRP9100 Research Proposal Approval (1 hour)

OTOE9100 Oral Exam in Old Testament (1 hour)

OTPA9100 Dissertation Prospectus Approval (1 hour)

OTWC9600 Writing Candidate in Old Testament (6 hours)

OTDD9100 Dissertation Defense (1 hour)
Students majoring in Old Testament may count one of the following seminars toward the five required seminars in the major:
BSBB9401 The Dead Sea Scrolls
BSBB9402 Archaeology in the Ancient Near East
BSBB9403 Studies in Syro-Palestinian Archaeology
BSBB9404 Studies in Greco-Roman Archaeology
BSBB9405 Readings in NW Semitic Literature

Philosophy of Religion

PHIL9401 Contemporary Issues in Philosophy of Religion (4 hours) Stewart
A focused and intensive study of a particular issue(s) of significance in contemporary theology. Attention is given to historical antecedents, as well as logical, theological, ethical, and cultural consequences of the issue or issues studied. Special attention is given to scholars advocating or critiquing the issue or issues considered in the seminar. Accordingly their presuppositions, methodology, and arguments are analyzed and critiqued, giving special attention to biblical and theological concerns. The seminar may be repeated provided the focus of the course is significantly different each time. Also can be taken as APOL9401.

PHIL9402 Contemporary Philosophical Hermeneutics (4 hours) Stewart, Putman, Ray
An intensive study of contemporary hermeneutical methods focusing particularly on those drawing from philosophy and literary-criticism such as deconstruction, structuralism, poststructuralism, reader-response theories, and canon criticism, as well as those derived from or indebted to sociological, psychological, and/or political theory, such as the hermeneutics of suspicion, Marxist, Freudian, and various liberation theologies. Attention will be given to explicating the presuppositions and methodologies of leading representatives of each school. Additionally, critiques will highlight areas of promise and/or peril for biblical interpretation and theological construction. Also can be taken as THEO9417.

PHIL9406 World Religions (4 hours) Edens
This study of the world’s living religions treats them individually with attention to historical development and doctrinal content. Emphasis is given to the role of cultural influences in the formation of the religion and in the process of sharing the Christian witness with them. Also can be taken as APOL9406, MISS9406, or THEO9406.

PHDS9400 Directed Study in Philosophy of Religion (4 hours) Faculty

Theology

THEO9401 The Doctrine of God (4 hours) Lemke, Stewart
An intensive study of the doctrine of God is made through an analysis of the biblical data in the light of historical and contemporary interpretations. A contemporary theology of God is developed.

THEO9402 The Doctrine of Humanity (4 hours) Lemke, Riley, Brooks
An intensive study of the doctrine of humanity is made through an analysis of the biblical data in the light of historical and contemporary interpretations. A contemporary theological understanding of humanity is developed.

THEO9403 The Person of Christ (4 hours) Stewart
An intensive study of the doctrine of the person of Christ is made through an analysis of the biblical data in the light of historical and contemporary interpretations. A contemporary theological understanding of the person of Christ is developed.

THEO9404 The Work of Christ (4 hours) Harwood, Riley
An intensive study of the doctrine of the work of Christ is made through an analysis of the biblical data in the light of historical and contemporary interpretations. A contemporary theological understanding of the work of Christ is developed.

THEO9405 Theology of the Major Reformers (4 hours) Edens, Stewart, Harwood, Butler, Holcomb
Beginning with an overview of late medieval theology, especially of those flashpoints that elicited increasing debate and dissent, the seminar addresses significant features of Reformation thought on the European continent during the 16th century. Also can be taken as HIST9405.

THEO9406 World Religions (4 hours) Edens, Lemke, Stewart
This study of the world’s living religions treats them individually with attention to historical development and doctrinal content. Emphasis is given to the role of cultural influences in the formation of the religion and in the process of sharing the Christian witness with them. Also can be taken as APOL9406, MISS9406, or PHIL9406.

THEO9407 New Testament Theology (4 hours) Stewart, Ray
Study is made of selected theological emphases in the Greek New Testament. The Hebrew Old Testament, the Septuagint, and nonbiblical writings offering light on New Testament usage, as well as current literature, are studied. Also can be taken as NTGK9403.

THEO9408 Theological Interpretation of Scripture (4 hours) Edens, Lemke, Putman, Stewart
This doctoral seminar in the theological interpretation of Scripture is an interdisciplinary exploration of the relationship between biblical studies, theology, and hermeneutics. Complementing the traditional historical exegesis offered in other courses, this seminar offers a critical evaluation of the way in which the contemporary church and the church throughout history have read the Bible as the Word of God. Students will be exposed to important theoretical works in theological hermeneutics, as well as theological commentaries on biblical books.

THEO9410 Theological Method (4 hours) Putman, Stewart
Students will read contemporary theologies and books about theological method to discover the purposes of the authors and the theological methods employed in pursuit of those purposes. Also serves as a missions seminar.

THEO9411 Baptist Theologians (4 hours) Harwood, Harsch
In this seminar students are required to read the major systematic theologies written by Baptists in America in the 19th and 20th centuries. Also can be taken as HIST9411.

THEO9412 Contemporary Evangelical Theology (4 hours) Lemke
Students in this seminar will analyze the particular theological concerns of evangelicals and will survey the major contributions to evangelical theology in the 20th century, giving special attention to the last half of this century. An attempt will be made to relate evangelical theology to the broader spectrum of Christian theology.

THEO9413 Historical Jesus (4 hours) Stewart, Ray
The seminar introduces students to theological, biblical, philosophical, and methodological issues related to contemporary Historical Jesus research. Issues addressed include the nature of the task, the role of the historian, tools for the task, and past and contemporary personalities in Historical Jesus research. The seminar will emphasize personal reading, research, and writing. Also can be taken as APOL9413 or NTGK9413.

THEO9414 Contemporary Issues in Theology: Atheism and Relativism (4 hours) Stewart
The seminar addresses contemporary expressions of atheism and relativism in the academy and culture, including issues that relate to evangelism, biblical studies, apologetics, philosophy, and ethics. Special attention is given to historical and intellectual precursors of atheism and relativism, their contemporary expressions, and the methodological presuppositions of those advocating or opposing atheism and relativism. The seminar emphasizes personal reading, research, and writing and will build upon the summer study trip to Wycliffe Hall, Oxford. Students not taking part in the Oxford Study Trip may also take the course for credit with extra work being assigned. Also can be taken as APOL9414.

THEO9415 Theology of Religions (4 hours) Stewart
The seminar constitutes an intensive study of key issues concerning how Christianity relates to other religions, focusing particularly upon the differing conceptions of God, Jesus, and salvation. Attention is given to pertinent biblical testimony, historical developments, and contemporary perspectives on these issues with a mind to critiquing various perspectives and constructing a suitable Christian response. Also can be taken as APOL9415.

THEO9416 Christology in the Early Church (4 hours) Butler, Stewart
The seminar advances the student’s knowledge of Christology in the early church, particularly as related to historical and theological context. The issues treated in the seminar include the person and work of Christ and the Trinity. Primary attention will be given to selected church fathers, controversies, and church councils. Also can be taken as APOL9416 or HIST9416.

THEO9417 Contemporary Philosophical Hermeneutics (4 hours) Stewart, Putman, Ray
An intensive study of contemporary hermeneutical methods focusing particularly on those drawing from philosophy and literary-criticism such as deconstruction, structuralism, poststructuralism, reader-response theories, and canon criticism, as well as those derived from or indebted to sociological, psychological, and/or political theory, such as the hermeneutics of suspicion, Marxist, Freudian, and various liberation theologies. Attention will be given to explicating the presuppositions and methodologies of leading representatives of each school. Additionally, critiques will highlight areas of promise and/or peril for biblical interpretation and theological construction. Also can be taken as PHIL9402.

THEO9418 Orthodoxy and Heresy in the Early Church (4 hours) Butler, Riley, Stewart
This seminar examines the development of and relationship between orthodoxy and heresy in the early church. Topics include early heresies, such as Gnosticism, Marcionism, and Montanism; early church fathers and writings; and the responses of the church to heresy. Special attention is also given to contemporary discussions about orthodoxy and heresy with the intention of developing an effective apologetic response to critics of traditional views of Christianity. Also can be taken as APOL9418 or HIST9418.

THEO9419 Keepers of the Springs: The Devotional Classics and the Heritage of Christian Spirituality (4 hours) Riley, Holcomb
This seminar is a theological and historical examination of Christian spirituality through the lens of the classics of Christian devotion. Attention is given to the dynamics of the Christian life and the disciplines that nurture it. The seminar explores the relationship of the classics to current discussions on the method and content of spiritual theology. Also can be taken as HIST9410.

THEO9420 Doctrine of the Holy Spirit (4 hours) Riley, Brooks
An intensive study of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit is made through an analysis of the biblical data in the light of historical and contemporary interpretations. A contemporary theological understanding of the Holy Spirit is developed.

THDS9400 Directed Study in Theology (4 hours) Faculty

THSR9301 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Systematic Theology (3 hours)

THSR9302 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Historical Theology (3 hours)

THSR9303 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Philosophical Theology (3 hours)
Also can be taken as APSR9303.

THSR9304 Supervised Reading Colloquium: Baptist History and Theology (3 hours)

THQE9100 Qualifying Examination in Theology (1 hour)

THRP9100 Research Proposal Approval (1 hour) THOE9100 Oral Exam in Theology (1 hour)

THPA9100 Dissertation Prospectus Approval (1 hour)

THWC9600 Writing Candidate in Theology (6 hours)

THDD9100 Dissertation Defense (1 hour)

Students majoring in theology may count one of the following seminars toward the five required seminars in the major:
ETHC9401 Biblical Ethics
ETHC9402 Contemporary Christian Ethics
ETHC9404 History of Christian Ethical Thought
HIST9405 Theology of the Major Reformers
NTGK9403 New Testament Theology
OTHB9405 Theology of the Old Testament