Master of Theology

Degree Overview

Vocational Calling

To prepare students for further graduate study at the doctoral level; the scholarly enhancement of ministry; or some forms of teaching, research, or writing.

Program Outcomes

  1. Students will demonstrate mastery of knowledge of seminar and colloquium material.

  2. Students will demonstrate excellence in research.

  3. Students will demonstrate proficiency in presenting knowledge.

For further information, please contact:

  • Dr. Jeffrey B. Riley (Director of the Master of Theology Program)

ThM Purpose and Student Learning Outcomes

The Master of Theology degree program at New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary is a research degree designed to provide qualified students the opportunity to achieve fuller mastery in a discipline or disciplines than afforded in their previous master’s work. Those completing the degree are prepared for further graduate study, some forms of teaching, and disciplined reflection in ministry.

Graduates of the Master of Theology program will be able to do the following:

  • Demonstrate an advanced understanding of a focused area or discipline in the context of general theological study

  • Formulate productive questions

  • Design, implement, and report research

Program Requirements

Degree Components (31-35 hours)

course

hours

Major Concentration Component

18

Electives Component

6

Graduate Orientation (includes COOP7000)

(no credit)

Introduction to Doctoral Research and Writing

3

Thesis Component (in the area of the major concentration)*
*OR
two seminars in the major area

4
OR
8

Total Required: 31-35 hours

Admission  Requirements

Students may choose one of five major areas of study in this degree program: Biblical Studies, Christian Education, Church and Community Ministries, Pastoral Ministries, or Theological and Historical Studies.

  • An applicant must hold a bachelor’s degree from a college or university accredited by an agency related to the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA).

  • Applicants must have completed the MDiv degree, the MA degree, or the first theological degree in the appropriate area of study from a theological institution accredited by the Association of Theological Schools in the United States and Canada (ATS).

  • Applicants must demonstrate evidence of aptitude for advanced theological study. For unconditional acceptance of the application, the minimum GPA for prior graduate-level theological work is 3.25 on a 4.0 scale. Persons with a GPA of less than 3.25 may demonstrate potential through the GPA and the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) according to the following five-point sliding scale. For the application to be accepted unconditionally for further consideration, pending the other steps in the approval process, the individual must have a combined score of “0” or higher on the three components. Applicants with a combined score of -3 to -1 may be eligible for acceptance on probation. Scores may be no older than 5 years.

  • Applicants must have completed the following prerequisites in languages prior to admission.

Biblical Studies: a minimum of 12 semester hours of master’s-level Greek; 12 semester hours of master’s-level Hebrew (for NOBTS students these courses would include NTGK6300 Intermediate Greek Grammar, OTHB6300 Intermediate Hebrew Grammar, and exegesis courses); and 5 semester hours of French, German, or Latin.

Christian Education: a minimum of 6 semester hours of research statistics. Upon request, the division faculty will evaluate undergraduate courses to determine which, if any, apply toward the research statistics requirement. Requests must be submitted in writing with the application. Courses considered would be those similar in nature to NOBTS graduate courses CEST6300 Introduction to Educational Research and Statistics and CEST9300 Educational Research and Statistics. Applicants may choose to take CEST6300 Introduction to Research and Statistics during preresidency and seek approval to take CEST9300 Educational Research and Statistics within the first year after admission into the program.

Church and Community Ministries: a minimum of 3 semester hours of research statistics. Upon request, the division faculty will evaluate undergraduate courses to determine which, if any, apply toward the research statistics requirement. Requests must be submitted in writing with the application. Courses considered would be those similar in nature to the NOBTS graduate course COUN6374 Scientific Research and Program Evaluation.

Pastoral Ministries: a minimum of 6 semester hours of graduate- level biblical languages (Hebrew and/or Greek), 6 semester hours of a nonbiblical language (French, German, Latin, or Spanish), or 6 semester hours of research statistics. Statistics courses considered would be those similar in nature to NOBTS graduate courses CEST6300 Introduction to Educational Research and Statistics and CEST9300 Educational Research and Statistics. Applicants may choose to take CEST6300 Introduction to Research and Statistics during preresidency and seek approval to take CEST9300 Educational Research and Statistics within the first year after admission into the program.

Theological and Historical Studies: a minimum of 6 semester hours of master’s-level Greek; 6 semester hours of master’s-level Hebrew (for NOBTS students these courses would include NTGK6300 Intermediate Greek Grammar and OTHB6300 Intermediate Hebrew Grammar); and 5 semester hours of French, German, or Latin.

All Majors: Academic credits that are to be considered for meeting nonbiblical language or research statistics and methods requirements may not be more than 7 years old. The divisions will consider requests concerning unique circumstances. In addition to transcripted course credits, competency in a non-biblical language can be verified by testing arranged through the Office of Research Doctoral Programs.

Applicants whose primary spoken language is not English should follow the instructions in the International Students section of the catalog. The International Student Advisor for the Seminary is Dr. Paul Gregoire. Applicants may contact him by phone at 504.282.4455 or 1.800.NOBTS.01 or by e-mail at pgregoire@nobts.edu.

GRADE POINT AVERAGE AND GRADUATE RECORD EXAMINATION

-2

-1

0

+1

+2

GPA

below 3.0

3.01-3.25

3.26-3.5

3.51-3.75

3.76-4.0

GRE Verbal

below 146

146-152

153-156

157-160

above 160

GRE Writing

below 3.5

3.5

4.0

4.5-5.0

5.5-6.0

Although not included in the above calculation, the quantitative score will be considered in the overall evaluation of the applicant. The institutional code for New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary is 6472.

Admissions Process

  • A completed application including all supporting documents is due to the office of the Director of the Master of Theology Program by April 1/November 1.

  • The applicant must submit a research paper from the master’s program for review by the division. If no paper is available, the applicant should contact the appropriate division chairperson.

  • The applicant must complete a criminal background check through CastleBranch before the application can be considered.

  • The Director normally will conduct an interview with the applicant.

  • The division faculty will make a recommendation to the division chair regarding admission. The division chairperson may require an interview.

  • The division chair will present the division’s recommendation to the Master of Theology Admissions Committee, which is comprised of the chairpersons of the five divisions (Division of Biblical Studies, Division of Church and Community Ministries, Division of Discipleship and Ministry Leadership, Division of Pastoral Ministries, and Division of Theological and Historical Studies) and the Director of the Master of Theology Program, who chairs the committee.

Program Issues

  • Five majors are offered: Biblical Studies, Christian Education, Church and Community Ministries, Pastoral Ministries, and Theological and Historical Studies.

  • Normally, students would not take over 12 hours per semester. Exceptions must be approved by the Director of the Master of Theology Program.

  • Prior to taking doctoral seminars that may be eligible for transfer into a research doctoral program, the student must achieve a combined score of “0” or higher on the five-point sliding scale for application.

  • Doctoral students have first priority to enroll in doctoral seminars. If space permits, ThM students may enroll in doctoral seminars if they have the appropriate prerequisite course work and the approval of the instructor, the division of study, and the Associate Dean of Research Doctoral Programs.

  • Normally, a ThM student would take no more than one doctoral seminar at a time. Exceptions must be approved by the Director of the Master of Theology Program.

  • Normally, the ThM work will be completed on campus. However, in some cases up to 4 hours of work may be completed in an extension center setting with the approval of the Director of the Master of Theology Program.

  • Up to 4 hours may be taken in independent study under direct faculty supervision.

  • Students must maintain a 3.0 GPA on a 4.0 scale to remain enrolled in the ThM program.

  • An acceptable thesis of 60-100 pages in the area of the student’s major concentration ordinarily is required. In some circumstances, an acceptable alternative to the thesis requirement is the completion of two research doctoral seminars in the major area.

  • Continuous enrollment in the program is required.

  • The maximum time limit for completion of the program is 4 years.

  • For a student who completes the degree, up to two research doctoral seminars completed with a grade of “B” or above may be eligible for doctoral program credit, should the student be admitted to a research doctoral program and if permission is granted by the Research Doctoral Admissions Committee.

Thesis Process

  • During the first semester of the program, the student should be in dialogue with the chairperson of the division regarding a possible thesis direction and Thesis Advisor. The Director of the Master of Theology Program, in consultation with the division chairperson, will appoint the Thesis Advisor in accordance with the proposed area of research.

  • During the semester before the writing of the thesis and thesis registration, the student should work with the Thesis Advisor to develop a Thesis Proposal. The Thesis Proposal should include the following components:

    • Thesis Statement

    • Hypothesis

    • Review of Literature

    • Description of Research Methodology

    • Selected Bibliography

    The Thesis Proposal is normally no longer than 20 pages, not counting the bibliography.

  • The student should audit RDOC9303 Prospectus Development during a January or June doctoral miniterm.

  • The Thesis Advisor will work with the student to present the Thesis Proposal to the Research Doctoral Oversight Committee for review.

  • Final approval of the Thesis Proposal by the Thesis Advisor must be secured by the last day of the semester prior to the first semester of thesis registration.

  • Three plain-paper copies of the thesis must be submitted to the Director of the Master of Theology program by the April 1 or November 1 deadline prior to graduation.

  • Appropriate thesis and diploma fees must be paid at the time of submission.

  • A Thesis Review Committee shall be composed of the Thesis Advisor, one faculty member in the major area, and one faculty member outside the major area (appointed by the Director of the Master of Theology Program).

  • Four corrected final copies (on white, 20-lb., 100% cotton paper, unbound) must be submitted no later than 10 days prior to graduation.

ThM Courses

ThM course work is at an advanced level, either in ThM courses or in doctoral seminars. (Many ThM courses are designed around a core MDiv course. Thus, students normally attend the MDiv course meetings.

ThM courses require additional or lengthier assignments, particularly in research and writing.) See the MDiv section of the catalog for course descriptions of parallel courses.

COOP7000 An Introduction to NOBTS, the SBC, and the Cooperative Program
This core curriculum course offered in conjunction with Introduction to Doctoral Research and Writing is required to be taken in the first year. The course will acquaint students with a brief history of NOBTS, the SBC, and the Cooperative Program, as well as their current leadership and operation. In this course students also will gain an understanding of the significance and relationship of the Cooperative Program to the SBC and NOBTS.

RDOC9300 Introduction to Doctoral Research and Writing (3 hours)
In this course students will be introduced to the literature and techniques of advanced research. Special attention will be given to the development of research proposals and the presentation of research, including individual guidance in the form and style of research writing. The course must be taken during the student’s first year in the program.

THMD7400 ThM Directed Readings Study

Former ThD or PhD students who did not complete the degree may apply for the ThM program and request transfer of credit to the degree. If accepted, the student would register for the Directed Readings Study, in which a literature review of current works in the field would be produced.

THMP7010 ThM Program Proficiency

This is not a course per se. Students should register for this component in semesters in which no ThM course work is taken.

THMW7410 ThM Thesis Writing

Biblical Studies

BBOT7311 Syro-Palestinian Archaeology and the Old Testament

BBNT7301 Archaeology and the New Testament

BBNE7302 Archaeology of the Ancient Near East

OTEN7320 Theology of the Old Testament

OTHB7301 Hebrew Exegesis: Genesis 1‑11

OTHB7302 Hebrew Exegesis: Genesis 12‑36

OTHB7303 Hebrew Exegesis: Genesis 37‑50

OTHB7304 Hebrew Exegesis: Exodus

OTHB7305 Hebrew Exegesis: The Ten Commandments:
Exodus 20; Deuteronomy 5

OTHB7306 Hebrew Exegesis: Leviticus

OTHB7307 Hebrew Exegesis: Numbers

OTHB7308 Hebrew Exegesis: Deuteronomy

OTHB7309 Hebrew Exegesis: Joshua

OTHB7310 Hebrew Exegesis: Judges

OTHB7311 Hebrew Exegesis: Ruth

OTHB7312 Hebrew Exegesis: 1 & 2 Samuel

OTHB7313 Hebrew Exegesis: 1 & 2 Kings

OTHB7314 Hebrew Exegesis: 1 & 2 Chronicles

OTHB7315 Hebrew Exegesis: Ezra - Nehemiah - Esther

OTHB7316 Hebrew Exegesis: Job

OTHB7317 Hebrew Exegesis: Psalms

OTHB7318 Hebrew Exegesis: Proverbs

OTHB7319 Hebrew Exegesis: Ecclesiastes

OTHB7320 Hebrew Exegesis: Isaiah 1-39

OTHB7321 Hebrew Exegesis: Isaiah 40-66

OTHB7322 Hebrew Exegesis: Jeremiah - Lamentations

OTHB7323 Hebrew Exegesis: Ezekiel

OTHB7324 Hebrew Exegesis: Daniel

OTHB7325 Hebrew Exegesis: Hosea - Amos

OTHB7326 Hebrew Exegesis: Jonah

OTHB7327 Hebrew Exegesis: Habakkuk - Zephaniah

OTHB7328 Hebrew Exegesis: Haggai - Malachi

OTHB7329 Hebrew Exegesis: Zechariah

OTHB7330 Hebrew Exegesis: Song of Songs - Lamentations

OTBA7350 Biblical Aramaic

NTEN7320 New Testament Theology

NTGK7301 Greek Exegesis: Matthew

NTGK7302 Greek Exegesis: Mark

NTGK7303 Greek Exegesis: Luke

NTGK7304 Greek Exegesis: John

NTGK7305 Greek Exegesis: Acts

NTGK7306 Greek Exegesis: Romans

NTGK7307 Greek Exegesis: 1 Corinthians

NTGK7308 Greek Exegesis: 2 Corinthians

NTGK7309 Greek Exegesis: Galatians

NTGK7310 Greek Exegesis: Ephesians

NTGK7311 Greek Exegesis: Philippians ‑ Colossians

NTGK7312 Greek Exegesis: 1 & 2 Thessalonians

NTGK7313 Greek Exegesis: 1 & 2 Timothy

NTGK7314 Greek Exegesis: Prison Epistles

NTGK7315 Greek Exegesis: Pastoral Epistles

NTGK7316 Greek Exegesis: Hebrews

NTGK7317 Greek Exegesis: James

NTGK7318 Greek Exegesis: 1 Peter

NTGK7319 Greek Exegesis: 2 Peter

NTGK7320 Greek Exegesis: 1‑3 John

NTGK7321 Greek Exegesis: The Revelation

NTGK7322 Greek Exegesis: Sermon on the Mount

NTGK7323 Greek Exegesis: Parables

NTGK7390 Textual Criticism of the Greek New Testament

NTGK7391 Studies in New Testament Manuscripts

NTGK7393 Advanced Greek Grammar

NTGK7395 Readings in Hellenistic Greek

BSIS7399 Independent Study in Biblical Studies

Christian Education

CEAM7317 Church Business Administration

CECH7333 Leading Children’s Ministry

CEEF7300 Historical Foundations of Christian Education

CEEF7301 Foundations of Christian Education

CEEF7302 Foundations in Educational Psychology

CEEF7310 Teaching the Bible

CEYH7341 Understanding Contemporary Adolescents

Church and Community Ministries

CCSW7310 Social Work Practice with Groups

CCSW7361 Social Welfare Policy and Planning

CCSW7363 Social Work Practice with Juvenile Delinquents

CCSW7314 Interpersonal Relationship Skills

CCSW7365 Death, Loss, and Grief

CCSW7366 Social Work Practice with Children and Families

CCSW7367 Social Work Practice with Individuals and Families

CCSW7368 Social Work Practice with Organizations & Communities

CCSW7369 Social Work Practice with the Aging and Their Families

COUN7301 Psychopathology: Diagnosis and Treatment

COUN7304 Family Systems Theory in Practice

COUN7351 Counseling Theories and Treatment

COUN7355 Brief Approaches to Individual, Marriage and Family Therapy

Pastoral Ministries

PATH7333 Church Ministries Creation and Contextualization

PATH7334 Stress and Conflict Management

PREA7306 Pastoral Preaching

PREA7307 Evangelistic Preaching

PREA7313 Contemporary Bible Exposition

PREA7314 Preaching Bible Doctrine

PREA7316 Preaching from Historical-Narrative Literature

PREA7317 Preaching from Poetic and Wisdom Literature

PREA7318 Preaching from the Prophets

PREA7319 Preaching from the Gospels

PREA7320 Preaching from the Epistles

PREA7321 Preaching from Apocalyptic Literature

PREA7322 Pulpit Apologetics

PREA7331 History of American Preaching

CHPL7380 Principles of Church Planting

CHPL7381 Strategic Church Planting for Multiplication

CHPL7382 Urban Church Planting

CHPL7384 Church Planting in the African-American Community

EVAN7332 Clinical Field Project in Evangelism or Church Planting

EVAN7351 Contemporary Trends in Growing an Evangelistic Church

EVAN7352 Biblical Principles and Practices of Evangelism

EVAN7354 Great Revivals and Awakenings

MISS7330 History of Baptist Missions

MISS7331 Regional Studies

MISS7332 Contemporary Mission Methods and Movements

MISS7233 The Persecuted Church

MISS7335 Last Frontiers

MISS7340 History of Christian Missions

MISS7342 Introduction to Urban Missions

MISS7343 Transcultural Communication of the Gospel

MISS7344 World Religions: Eastern Religions

MISS7345 World Religions: Islam

MISS7346 World Religions: Judaism

MISS7348 Life and Work of the Missionary

MISS7349 Anthropology for Missions and Ministry

MISS7351 Linguistics for Missionaries

MISS7358 Persecution and Martyrdom Yesterday and Today

PMIS7399 Independent Study in Pastoral Ministries

Theological & Historical Studies

ETHC7301 Biblical Ethics

HIST7301 History of Early Christianity

HIST7302 Christian Devotional Classics

HIST7311 Renaissance and Reformation

HIST7313 The Radical Reformation

HIST7321 History of Modern Christianity

HIST7322 Modern Renewal Movements

HIST7324 Contemporary American Religion

HIST7325 History of the Southern Baptist Convention

HIST7326 History of American Christianity

HIST7327 Heresy and Orthodoxy in the Early Church

HIST7331 History of American Preaching

HIST7358 Persecution and Martyrdom Yesterday and Today

PHIL7301 Philosophical Theology

PHIL7302 Contemporary Hermeneutical Theory

PHIL7304 Apologetic Method

PHIL7305 The Problem of Evil

PHIL7314 Theology of C. S. Lewis

PHIL7329 Jesus and Islam

THEO7301 The Doctrine of Revelation

THEO7302 The Person and Work of Christ

THEO7303 The Person and Work of the Holy Spirit

THEO7304 Eschatology

THEO7305 Issues in Contemporary Theology

THEO7306 Cult Theology

THEO7307 The Doctrine of Salvation

THEO7308 The Doctrine of the Church

THEO7314 Theology of C. S. Lewis

THEO7327 Heresy and Orthodoxy in the Early Church

THEO7329 Jesus and Islam

THEO7358 Persecution and Martyrdom Yesterday and Today

THIS7399 Independent Study in Christian Thought